Bernard Shaw, Frank Harris & Oscar Wilde

By Robert Harborough Sherard | Go to book overview

II
THE ROMANCE OF THE "WILDE ROSE"

I AM afraid I wondered less what Henry D. Davray—I know nothing about Madame Madeleine Vernon or que diable allait‐ elle faire dans cette galère—may have thought when he had realized from Maître Théry's article what sort of an Oscar Wilde he, Davray, had presented to the French public.Probably even more keenly than Harris did he appreciate the "pulling" power of this description of the book and its hero. For the simple reason that, financially, he was even more interested in the sales of the French version than Harris himself, as he would have his share not only in the royalties earned, but a part also of the publisher's profits, for Davray has capital invested in the Mercure de France publishing business.Still, one could not help asking oneself whether he did not hesitate as Wilde's whilom friend and beneficiary before publishing in the periodical issued by his firm, the extract from which I have quoted above and which represents Oscar Wilde as a sordid debauchee, a liar, a drunkard and a swindler.Surely Davray knew that Wilde was none of these things.He used to frequent him in Paris during the period when, according to Harris, Wilde was developing these characteristics and he must have known how utterly he had been misrepresented.He was twenty years younger than Wilde when they were so much together in 1898, and he had not then particularly distinguished himself in any way, nor was it till two years later that the first of his literary labours (a translation of Sir Edmund Gosse's Modern English Literature) attracted any attention to his name.It was, therefore, only Wilde's native kindness and—

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bernard Shaw, Frank Harris & Oscar Wilde
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.