Bernard Shaw, Frank Harris & Oscar Wilde

By Robert Harborough Sherard | Go to book overview

XVIII
HOW FRANK PUT OSCAR IN EASY STREET

HARRIS had all the less excuse for his lies about Wilde's conduct during the year 1898—the year of "the great romantic passion"—that we know that during the whole time he was concocting his narrative he had at hand André Gide's little brochure about Wilde which he copiously both quoted and plagiarized.From this book he could have gathered—though, of course, he was well aware of the fact—that during the whole of that year, 1898, when he depicted Wilde as spending money lavishly on Florentine bronzes, Wilde was in one of those periods of "extreme poverty" to which Robert Ross refers in the preface to De Profundis.

Wilde returned to Paris after the Naples fiasco in December, 1897. Lady Queensberry's £200, which Bosie had put— "crowns for convoy"—into Oscar's purse, had all been spent and he had no means of subsistence except an allowance of £10 or £12 a month, supplemented by occasional driblets from Smithers, the publisher.How small these were may be gathered from his letters to Smithers.On March I5th, 1898, he writes from the Hôtel de Nice: "1000 thanks for the £4." Two months later, he writes from the same address, May 2Oh, 1898, to beg him, if he can, to send him £4, "or even £ 3" so that he can get his morning breakfast at his inn, where one supposes they had refused to give him credit any longer.But let us concede that Harris had not seen these pitiful letters (in which threats of suicide are not infrequent); he certainly had read in Gide, how one evening in the summer of the great and costly passion, he was hailed by Wilde as he was walking on

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bernard Shaw, Frank Harris & Oscar Wilde
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 299

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.