Morality and Expediency: The Folklore of Academic Politics

By F. G. Bailey; Alfred Harris | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Community and Organization

Two Stories

Conversing about universities with a friend, I heard two stories and at first sight his values seemed the wrong way round: he was furiously indignant about a trifling matter, while amused and tolerant over the grossest negligence. Here are the stories.

A member of a social science department had proposed himself for advancement to a senior rank. At that university all advancements were considered by a scholar's peers, and on this occasion they unanimously and strongly advised the Dean that the advancement should not be made.The man had never written a book on his subject nor even contributed an article to a learned journal. But he did enjoy a wide reputation because he wrote newspaper commentaries on matters of public concern and gave a weekly program on local radio and television. He made his discipline and his university visible and audible and his file was filled with letters of recommendation from editors and politicians and other leading citizens. But no scholar, neither in his own university nor elsewhere, was willing to give him the testimonial appropriate to the high rank to which he aspired.

My friend had no doubts about the correct decision: deny the advancement. What the man did amounted at best to public relations and was in no sense a contribution to scholarship: in fact he was nothing more than — the word was an explosion of contempt — a 'popularizer'.

His other story was about a large department in which

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Morality and Expediency: The Folklore of Academic Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Morality and Expediency - The Folklore of Academic Politics *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Introduction *
  • Chapter One - Myth, Reality, and Politics *
  • Chapter Two - Community and Organization *
  • Chapter Three - Chapter *
  • Chapter Four - Committees *
  • Chapter Five - Arenas and Enmities *
  • Chapter Six - Masks *
  • Chapter Seven - the Unexpected *
  • Chapter Eight Privacy, Community, Order and Change *
  • References *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.