The Mind of the Middle Ages, A.D. 200-1500: An Historical Survey

By Frederick B. Artz | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Notes

THESE NOTES are in a very summary form; nearly all comments and, at least, a third of the works consulted by the author have been omitted. Preference has always been given to more recent works and to those written in English and French. Many of the books and articles cited contain bibliographies. To save space, titles have sometimes been shortened. Under any given topic, the list of titles starts with general works and moves on to more detailed studies. Works that the author found of unusual value are starred.

SOME GENERAL WORKS . * Cambridge mediaeval history ( 2nd ed., 8 vols., 1924-36) with elaborate bibliographies; W. H. Allison and others, eds., Guide to historical literature ( New York, 1931); L. J. Paetow, *Guide to the study of mediaeval history ( 2nd ed., New York, 1931); C. P. Farrar and A. P. Evans, * Bibliography of English translations from mediaeval sources ( New York, 1946); F. S. Smith, The classics in translation, an annotated guide ( New York, 1930); A. Baudrillart, * Dictionnaire d'historie et de géographie ecclésiastique ( Paris, 1912-23); F. Cabrol and H. Leclerq, * Dictionnaire d'archéologie chrétienne et de liturgie ( Paris, 1913 ff.); A. Vacant and E. Mangenot, * Dictionnaire de théologie catholique ( Paris, 1909 ff.); H. F. Williams, ed., Index of mediaeval studies published in Festschriften 1865-1946 ( Berkeley, 1951); J. Delorme, Chronologie des civilisations ( Paris, 1949); S. H. Steinberg, *Historical tables 58 B.C. -A.D. 1945 ( 3rd ed., London, 1953); H. O. Taylor, * The mediaeval mind ( 4th ed., 2 vols., New York, 1925) still the best single book on intellectual history of the Middle Ages, though it does nothing with the Byzantine and Islamic culture or with art, music, and other topics, and it stops with Dante; G. Schnürer, L'église et la civilisation au moyen âge ( 3 vols., Paris, 1933-8); * Speculum ( Cambridge, Mass., 1926 ff.), its bibliographies are the best means of keeping abreast of new studies, and these bibliographies keep those in the Cambridge mediaeval history and in Paetow's manual up to date; cf. also * Progress of mediaeval and Renaissance studies in the United States and Canada ( Boulder, Colo., 1923 ff.).

SOME ANTHOLOGIES. C. W. Jones, ed., * Mediaeval literature in translation ( New York, 1950); J. B. Ross and M. M. McLaughlin, eds., The portable mediaeval reader ( New York, 1949); and G. G. Coulton, ed., * Life in the Middle Ages ( 4 vols., Cambridge, 1930); and, finally, for pictures to illustrate mediaeval

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The Mind of the Middle Ages, A.D. 200-1500: An Historical Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to First Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments x
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiv
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • Part One - The Dominance of the East 1
  • Chapter I - The Classical Backgrounds of Mediaeval Christianity 3
  • Chapter II - The Jewish and Early Christian Sources of Mediaeval Faith 39
  • Chapter III - The Patristic Age, 2nd-5th Centuries 64
  • Chapter IV - Byzantine Civilization 95
  • Chapter V - Islamic Civilization 132
  • Chapter VI - The Latin West, 5th-10th Centuries 179
  • Part Two - The Revival of the West, 1000-1500 223
  • Chapter VII - Learning (I) 225
  • Chapter VIII - Learning (II) 270
  • Chapter IX - Literature (I) 320
  • Chapter X - Literature (II) 355
  • Chapter XI - Art and Music 384
  • Chapter XII - Underlying Attitudes 419
  • Epilogue 443
  • Notes 456
  • Bibliographical Notes 503
  • Index 559
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