Russian Women's Studies: Essays on Sexism in Soviet Culture

By Tatyana Mamonova; Margaret Maxwell | Go to book overview

Preface

Without the combined efforts of many people, this book would have been impossible. It is my intent that my role be unobtrusive, it is the role of a publicist who wishes to bring information to readers of all nations about the works of Russian women — be they scientists, thinkers, critics, authors or artists.The seed is theirs, only the soil is mine. I tried to give them fertile soil to sprout and grow. But neither soil nor seed would be enough without inspiration. My translators provided the book's aura, and for their work I am grateful from the bottom of my heart. I owe special thanks to Sydney Vetter who was my faithful assistant at the University of Michigan and remains my good friend to this day.Sydney worked on the translations of my Russian texts with love and enthusiasm, and she helped me bring the treasures of our feminist culture to my students.I am also grateful to my Boston friends. Julie Pavlon worked at the Schlesinger Library during my stay at the Bunting Institute, and counseled me on many issues of American life.Julie corrected and retyped my texts for three years.Now, as a member of the staff of the Women's Studies Committee of Harvard University, she continues to furnish me with essential information that facilitates my orientation to the feminist movement in the US. I can never forget the splendid help of Sarah Ferguson, at MIT, who wrote a Russian program for me on the computer, and resolutely demonstrated her solidarity.My deep appreciation goes to Lisa Brody for her executive abilities.I also wish to say "Thank you" to dear Laura Goering, at Cornell University; to Andrea Chandler and Julie Daunyte, in Canada; to Professor J. Warhola, the University of Maine; Lesley Rimmel, the University of Pennsylvania; Professor W. Wien, from Washington, DC; Rebecca Park, Princeton University; Professor G. Cox, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas; Eva Secular, from Oregon; Carey Stevens, Duke University; Dorothea Breamer, from New York City; Sue Hodge, from Minnesota, R. Teasley, from Michigan; S. Matilsky, from Vermont; Helene Reed, from North Carolina, who translated material for this book even when she was in China! My thanks go also to many others, too numerous to name here.I am deeply grateful to my husband Gennady for his

-xi-

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