Russian Women's Studies: Essays on Sexism in Soviet Culture

By Tatyana Mamonova; Margaret Maxwell | Go to book overview

22
Solidarity Between American
and Soviet Feminists

The feminist movement started in Russia during the same period as in America, in the middle of the nineteenth century.In the United States, thanks to the diligent work and struggle of feminist activists, there now exists a body of research on the history and current status of women. But in the Soviet Union the names of prominent women have been forgotten, regardless of the fact that in their time they exerted significant influence upon the life of Russian society.

Tsebrikova, Trubnikova, Filosofova, Khvoshchinskaya, and others — who remembers them? Only a few specialists in the history of pre-revolutionary movements even know their names.These pioneering women organized the first university for women in Petersburg, published their own journals on education and child rearing, and participated in international congresses of feminists in Europe, which were also attended by American women. 1 In Geneva, in 1869 Trubnikova met with Josephine Butler, and together they discussed the possibilities for enlarging the international women's community by means of an international feminist press.The importance of Filosofova's work was recognized by the International Council of Women when they appointed her Honorary Vice President around the turn of the century, and asked her to form a National Council of Women in Russia.

In those days women understood the necessity for association, for the exchange of ideas and the mutual support people striving toward a common goal are entitled to. They were convinced that in order to raise the social status of women, and to enable them to realize their scientific and professional aims, they must create a sounding board that would, at last, provide a free and broadly based forum for the development and comparison of various plans of action and experiences of feminists in different countries.

In one of the many newspaper and magazine articles written about the Almanak, Zhenschchina i Rossiya ( Woman and Russia), * the contemporary

____________________
*
The title of the book, consisting of articles from the Almanac, published by Beacon Press in 1984, is Women and Russia.

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russian Women's Studies: Essays on Sexism in Soviet Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 179

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.