ball player, Blumer was a graduate student of the great philosopher and social psychologist, George Herbert Mead.Now Professor of Sociology at the University of California at Berkeley, he is the author of numerous articles, books, and monographs in social psychology and sociology.His associates, Alan Sutter and Samir Ahmed, are graduate assistants who worked on the Oakland project which culminated in the volume from which the selection is taken. Roger Smith, also a worker on this project, is the Director of the Wesley Center, designed to discourage teenagers from using drugs.


NOTES
1.
For an example of this argument, see Alfred R. Lindesmith and John Gagnon, " Anomie and Drug Addiction," in Marshall B. Clinard , ed., Anomie and Deviant Behavior ( New York: The Free Press, 1964), pp. 171-174.
2.
According to Becker's hypothesis, the more one is involved in the psychedelic subculture, the less likely it is that one will suffer a psychotic episode (a "freak out" in the argot) during a "trip," because subcultural definitions and expectations largely determine the nature of the experience. Howard S. Becker, " History, Culture, and Subjective Experience: An Exploration of the Social Bases of Drug‐ Induced Experiences," Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 8:3 ( September 1967), 163-176.
3.
Between the late Summer of 1967, when the editor completed the interviewing for his marijuana study, and the Spring of 1968, when this volume went to press, the editor noticed a sudden and remarkable drop in the consumption of LSD among his interviewees and their friends.Very few of those he interviewed, and with whom he continued to have contact after the interview, took LSD at all between these dates.Many complained that LSD was simply not available; many others were not interested in taking it any longer. Clearly the stories and articles detailing the adverse effects of the drug, particularly on the chromosomes, influenced the attitudes of the latter group. For an example of one of these persuasive articles, see Bill Davidson, " The Hidden Evils of LSD," The Saturday Evening Post ( August 12, 1967), 19-23. In addition, stronger police vigilance probably reduced the supply of the drug.Users of LSD often claim that the crack-down is due to the radical political activity and attitudes of the psychedelic drug culture, as well as their unwillingness to bribe the police.See, for instance, Irving Shushnick , " Never Trust a Man With a Beard," East Village Other ( January 12-January 19, 1968), 4. It is likely that other pyschedelic drugs, such as mescaline. will replace LSD in this subculture.

-65-

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Marijuana
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Marijuana *
  • Marijuana *
  • Preface ix
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • I - The Question of Motivation 15
  • The Psychology of the Marijuana Smoker 16
  • Dependence on Cannabis 19
  • Marijuana Use and the Social Context 25
  • II - Physiological Effects of Marijuana 42
  • The Medical View 47
  • The Smoker's View 52
  • The Policeman's View 58
  • III - The Connection Between Marijuana and Heroin *
  • Living Death 65
  • The Missing Link 67
  • Marijuana Smoking as a Precursor of Opiate Addiction in the United States 69
  • Attitudes Toward Addiction 85
  • IV - The Dealer: Buying and Selling Marijuana 88
  • The Pusher 90
  • On Selling Marijuana 92
  • Green Grows the Grass on the Lower East Side 103
  • V - Marijuana in the Schools *
  • Marijuana and LSD on the Campus 112
  • The High School Drug Problem 121
  • Drug Use Among Affluent High School Youth 128
  • VI - The Question of Legalization *
  • Down with Prohibition 139
  • Notes on the Use of Hashish 141
  • Should We Legalize Pot ? 147
  • Nightmare Drugs 152
  • Marijuana and the American System 154
  • Marijuana and Legal Controls 155
  • VII - The Epistemology and Esthetics of Pot *
  • The Weed of Madness 175
  • Some Thoughts on Marijuana and the Artist 177
  • Bibliography *
  • Index 193
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