juana smoking invariably takes place among intimates: one is usually "turned on" by friends, not a "pusher." Moreover, marijuana distribution is a seller's market; the dealer does not have to seek out customers—they come to him.

Our second selection is by a thirty-year-old market research aide in the communications industry who at one time was a dealer. His description, prepared at the request of the editor, is an account of the activity from the inside. The writer must, obviously, remain anonymous. Of the points made in this selection, at least one is notable: close to a majority of all marijuana smokers have probably sold marijuana at least once. The overwhelming majority of these sell in very small quantities, usually only to friends, and usually only when the friend is temporarily out of supply. (More common than selling is the giving away of marijuana; since it is smoked in groups, any particular "joint" passed around for common consumption belonged to one person to begin with.) Selling does not, then, make a person a dealer, who must sell specifically for a profit and sell enough, if not to support himself, then at least to make a difference in his standard of living. Don McNeill, now deceased, was until 1968 a reporter for New York's The Village Voice. His article describes another facet of the dealer's world.

-90-

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Marijuana
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Marijuana *
  • Marijuana *
  • Preface ix
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • I - The Question of Motivation 15
  • The Psychology of the Marijuana Smoker 16
  • Dependence on Cannabis 19
  • Marijuana Use and the Social Context 25
  • II - Physiological Effects of Marijuana 42
  • The Medical View 47
  • The Smoker's View 52
  • The Policeman's View 58
  • III - The Connection Between Marijuana and Heroin *
  • Living Death 65
  • The Missing Link 67
  • Marijuana Smoking as a Precursor of Opiate Addiction in the United States 69
  • Attitudes Toward Addiction 85
  • IV - The Dealer: Buying and Selling Marijuana 88
  • The Pusher 90
  • On Selling Marijuana 92
  • Green Grows the Grass on the Lower East Side 103
  • V - Marijuana in the Schools *
  • Marijuana and LSD on the Campus 112
  • The High School Drug Problem 121
  • Drug Use Among Affluent High School Youth 128
  • VI - The Question of Legalization *
  • Down with Prohibition 139
  • Notes on the Use of Hashish 141
  • Should We Legalize Pot ? 147
  • Nightmare Drugs 152
  • Marijuana and the American System 154
  • Marijuana and Legal Controls 155
  • VII - The Epistemology and Esthetics of Pot *
  • The Weed of Madness 175
  • Some Thoughts on Marijuana and the Artist 177
  • Bibliography *
  • Index 193
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