Effective Communication Skills for Scientific and Technical Professionals

By Harry E. Chambers | Go to book overview

11
Effective Communication
in Meetings

You are being called upon to function more and more in interactive team environments. The hierarchical, top-down departmental alignment of the past has given way to the interactive, collaborative team environment. As organizations reorganize and flatten their internal structure, there are fewer front-line and middle managers. Tasks and responsibilities that were previously the domain of managers and supervisors are becoming the responsibility of those who are in staff support or line positions. In the past, information, goals, assignments, and decisions traditionally flowed from the top down. Today, individuals, departments, teams, and groups are finding authority and responsibility at much deeper functional levels of the organization. You are now more interactive and have accountability, not only for accomplishing your own responsibilities, you are also expected to enhance the performance of others.

Frequently you are asked or are required to participate in various types of teams. You contribute to cross-functional process-improvement teams, which are usually charged with reviewing and analyzing a specific function and then making recommendations for improvements (costs, time, efficiency, and so forth). These teams are given a definite period of time to accomplish their objective and then they disband. You and other STPs are highly valued and sought-after team members, owing primarily to your knowledge, intellect, and creativity.It would not be uncommon for you to be involved in a significant number of process-improvement teams during your career.

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