For Crying out Loud: Women's Poverty in the United States

By Diane Dujon; Ann Withorn | Go to book overview

A HOLE IN MY SOUL

Experiences of Homeless Women

Roofless Women's Action Research Mobilization
Researchers: Deborah Clarke, Delores Dell, Brenda Farrell,
Deborah Gray, Betsy Santiago, and Tesley Utley
edited and narrated by Marie Kennedy

In my soul, I'll always be formerly homeless. It changed me so much. Homelessness was probably one of the very roughest experiences of my life other than losing a child and it forced me to change because I couldn't be that person anymore and it forced me to grow and become strong to get out. That was the only positive thing that came out of it, that I'm the strong person that I am now, but that part of me will always be there, like a scar; there's a hole in my soul . . .

-- Brenda Farrell

THE FASTEST GROWING SEGMENT OF THE HOMELESS population in the United States is women and their children. The Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare ( DPW) 1 estimated that 3,000 families would enter the state-funded shelter system in 1995. This year, about the same number of women and children will seek refuge at battered women's shelters across the state. In response, a vast network of emergency shelters and services has developed to address the needs of homeless people. In fact, there are 40 individual, 49 family, 15 specialized, and 12 scattered site programs funded by DPW. There are 17 battered women's programs supported by the Massachusetts Department of Social Services ( DSS). Yet the problems are not being solved. Since 1991 there has been a 36 percent increase of homeless women and children in the DPW system and a 57 percent increase of women and children in battered women's shelters. The very services that are supposed to help homeless people are often, perhaps unwittingly, part of the problem. As Kip Tiernan, founder of

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
For Crying out Loud: Women's Poverty in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.