Words That Won the War: The Story of the Committee on Public Information, 1917-1919

By James R. Mock; Cedric Larson | Go to book overview

Chapter 16
BLUEPRINT FOR TOMORROW'S CPI

SIX days before the end of the World War and the supposed victory in the fight for the mind of mankind, George Creel received this letter from William Allen White, Republican editor of the Emporia Gazette:

" November 5, 1918

"DEAR GEORGE:

"Pardon me for neglecting your letter of October 29, but I have been a very busy little person since it came, saving our beloved country from the slimy clutches of your Democratic Party, and now that the country is saved again I take up your letter with joy.--I say joy because your letter discloses a situation which comes to every man more or less, and I have just been going through a parallel experience.

"I have on the Gazette one of those safe editorial writers who confines himself to lambasting the Turk and soaking the Kaiser and estimating the relation of the corn to the population, and who never has made me trouble. He takes his typewriter in hand about a month ago and writes what seemed to be a harmless editorial calling attention to the fact that in the new reorganization of society men were getting paid for manual labor, which requires little training, as much as college professors used to get, who spent years in training.

"I was in New York making Liberty Loan speeches when he sent it to me, and as I thought that it was a good thing that labor was coming into its own, and that the laborer and the college professor were getting about the same, I glanced through it hurriedly, put a head on, 'The Grand Shake-Up,' added a three-line cracker at the end, saying that in the grand

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