The Poems of Coventry Patmore

By Coventry Patmore; Frederick Page | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

BORN four years after Princess Victoria and dying five years before Queen Victoria, Patmore should have been a compleat Victorian, and in a sense (to be explained below) he was. In the years when 'midVictorian' was used as a term of contempt -- implying prudery, hypocrisy, snobbery, and dowdiness -- Patmore was derided as 'mid-Victorian', and certainly his lovepoetry was not adulterous, he called himself a Tory, and (except when his theme is timeless) he wrote of his own period. He was not a typical Victorian, for there never was one; every conspicuous Victorian was individual, and no one more so than Patmore. But he could be called the compleat Victorian, for it was almost usual with Victorians to be complete -- to be amateur-practitioners of more than one or two of the arts and sciences. Thus, Patmore was a chemist (he persuaded himself that as a boy he had discovered a new chloride of bromine; as a man he made the family fireworks for Guy Fawkes Day), a mathematician, an astronomer, a most interesting theorist in architecture, a leading theorist in prosody, a successful farmer, an animal-lover, a connoisseur of precious stones. He earned his living -- while he needed to earn it -- as a writer for the reviews and as an assistant librarian at the British Museum.

He was married three times, very happily, and his second wife brought him money which enabled him to consult his own health and to retire from the

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poems of Coventry Patmore
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xvii
  • From Poems, 1844 1
  • From Tamerton Church-Tower And Other Poems, 1853, 1854 29
  • The Angel in the House 59
  • The Victories of Love 209
  • Three Poems 1861-1866 339
  • The Unknown Eros 1877 345
  • Five Poems, 1877-8 445
  • Amelia, Etc. 1878 453
  • Four Poems 1887 471
  • Fragments 477
  • Index of Titles And Some Subjects 493
  • Iindex of First Lines 497
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 506

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.