The Poems of Coventry Patmore

By Coventry Patmore; Frederick Page | Go to book overview

IINDEX OF FIRST LINES
A BEE, beloved, is least of fowls 483
A bee upon a briar-rose hung 483
A cloud-bank pale 490
A florin to the willing Guard 448
A keen, sweet, and constant ardour 487
A million crowned Brides 481
A noxious flying thing 491
A song, Loud with the truth 479
A stately rainbow came and stood 155
A sweet and sunny intellect 491
A.woman is a foreign land 186
Ah, dearest Wife, a fresh-lit fire 205
Ah, God, alas. 387
Ah great, sweet Lord 479
Ah, heavenly fame 481
Ali, Jesus, what delight 487
Ah, Lord, Thy vine still gives Thee vinegar 483
Ah, turn away thine eyes 489
Ali, wasteful woman, she who may 79
Ah, yes; we tell the good and evil trees 384
All day for God to work or fight. 481
All I ask for the reward of love 481
All night fell hammers, shock on shock 56
Amid the mystic fields of Love 465
An idle poet, here and there 105
'And even our women', lastly grumbles Ben 464
And o'er that gravity so bright 492
Anne lived so truly from above 73
As a little bone, questioned by the anatomist 488
As a young Child, whose Mother, for a jest 438
As if I chafed the sparks from glass 196
As parched Egypt longs for rising Nile 484
As seen from smoky street, the thymy head 492
At Church, in twelve hours more, we meet 192

-497-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poems of Coventry Patmore
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Introduction vii
  • Contents xvii
  • From Poems, 1844 1
  • From Tamerton Church-Tower And Other Poems, 1853, 1854 29
  • The Angel in the House 59
  • The Victories of Love 209
  • Three Poems 1861-1866 339
  • The Unknown Eros 1877 345
  • Five Poems, 1877-8 445
  • Amelia, Etc. 1878 453
  • Four Poems 1887 471
  • Fragments 477
  • Index of Titles And Some Subjects 493
  • Iindex of First Lines 497
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 506

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.