A Sappho of Green Springs and Other Stories

By Bret Harte | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.

SIX months had passed. The Villa of Mæcenas was closed at Los Osos Cañon, and the southwest trade-winds were slanting the rains of the wet season against its shut windows and barred doors. Within that hollow, deserted shell, its aspect -- save for a single exception -- was unchanged; the furniture and decorations preserved their eternal youth undimmed by time; the rigidly-arranged rooms, now closed to life and light, developed more than ever their resemblance to a furniture warehouse. The single exception was the room which Grace Nevil had rearranged for herself; and that, oddly enough, was stripped and bare -- even to its paper and mouldings.

In other respects, the sealed treasures of Rushbrook's villa, far from provoking any sentimentality, seemed only to give truth to the current rumor that it was merely waiting to be transformed into a gorgeous watering- place hotel under Rushbrook's direction;

-255-

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A Sappho of Green Springs and Other Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • A Sappho of Green Springs. 1
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 18
  • Chapter III 31
  • Chapter IV 49
  • Chapter V 67
  • The Chatelaine of Burnt Ridge. 81
  • Chapter I 81
  • Chapter II 98
  • Chapter III 118
  • Through the Santa Clara Wheat. 131
  • Chapter I 131
  • Chapter II 150
  • Chapter III 171
  • Chapter IV 186
  • Chapter V 201
  • Chapter VI 214
  • A Mæcenas of the Pacific Slope. 228
  • Chapter I 228
  • Chapter II 237
  • Chapter III 246
  • Chapter IV 255
  • Chapter V 267
  • Chapter VI 279
  • Chapter VII 286
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