Duelling Languages: Grammatical Structure in Codeswitching

By Carol Myers-Scotton | Go to book overview

5
Regulating Two at Once, II:
Congruence in ML+EL Constituents
and EL Islands

Preliminaries

This chapter has several goals. First, it will continue the discussion from Chapter 4 of ML+EL constituents by introducing a new constraint on ML+EL constituents, a blocking filter. A Blocking Hypothesis proposes that a filter blocks not only EL system morphemes prohibited under the System Morpheme Principle presented in Chapter 4 but also EL content morphemes which do not show certain specified congruences with ML content morphemes. Second, in a related discussion, this chapter characterizes EL islands; obligatory EL islands are the result of certain non- congruences also involving the Blocking Hypothesis.

The System Morpheme Principle discussed in Chapter 4 makes the prediction that syntactically relevant EL system morphemes will not appear in ML+EL constituents; only syntactically relevant ML system morphemes are allowed. This prediction is supported by all available data; examples in addition to those already discussed will be presented later in this chapter. Clearly, this principle limits the occurrence of EL morphemes in these constituents. However, I now propose the Blocking Hypothesis as a corollary to the SM principle to limit further EL participation by blocking certain EL content morphemes as well.


The Blocking Hypothesis

In ML+EL constituents, a blocking filter blocks any EL content morpheme which is not congruent with the ML with respect to three levels of abstraction regarding subcategorization.

I use 'congruence' in this sense: two entities (linguistic categories in this case) are congruent if they correspond in respect of relevant qualities.

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Duelling Languages: Grammatical Structure in Codeswitching
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Symbols and Abbreviations xii
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • Summary 18
  • 2 - The Search for Structural Constraints on Codeswitching 19
  • Introduction 19
  • Conclusion 45
  • 3 - Background for the Matrix Language-Frame Model: Production Models and Identifying the Matrix Language 46
  • Introduction 46
  • 4 - Regulating Two at Once, I: the Matrix Language-Frame Model 75
  • 5 - Regulating Two at Once, Ii: Congruence in Ml+El Constituents and El Islands 120
  • 6 - Relating Lexical Borrowing and Codeswitching 163
  • 7 - Codeswitching and Deep Grammatical Borrowing 208
  • Introduction 208
  • Conclusion 227
  • 8: Conclusions 229
  • Afterword 240
  • References 260
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.