McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

It should be evident to everyone that the United States of America is facing a major crisis, on the outcome of which depends the integrity and security of the American people. In 1945 most Americans were living in a fool's paradise. America had just emerged as the victor in a great world war. Germany, Italy, and Japan, all formidable enemies, had been crushed. It seemed incredible to most people that America would again be imperilled for at least a century. Yet in 1952 it is obvious that America's position in world affairs is seriously weakened, and that in the absence of capable leadership the American people may be headed toward disaster.

During the period 1945-1952 the Communists were permitted to consolidate their position in Eastern Europe with the result that all of Western Europe is threatened with sudden and complete collapse and America has felt it necessary to make desperate efforts to maintain independent and friendly governments in that area. In the For East the amazing failure of our foreign policy is even more evident. For over fifty years one of the major items in our foreign policy has been to maintain the Open Door policy in China. By the Open Door policy is meant that the United States demands with respect to China, equal opportunity for all, special privilege for none, and the political, military, and economic independence of the Chinese government. It was because the United States was insistent upon maintaining the Open Door policy in China that she became involved in the war with Japan.

During the war with Japan, America spent many billions of dollars and suffered hundreds of thousands of casualties. But this enormous sacrifice seemed to be worth while, in 1945, when Japan was crushed and it appeared that the Open Door policy was completely restored. In the following few years, however, it became evident that the sacrifice was made in vain. Today the Open Door policy is far closer to being nullified than in 1941. Today the whole principle of equal opportunity has vanished into thin air. Today there is special privilege for power only, an unfriendly power, and to talk of the political, military, or economic independence of China is a farce.

In Korea we have met with disaster after disaster. Despite expert diplomatic and military advice, we withdrew our troops from South Korea in 1949, and made no plans to defend this area in case of attack. In 1950, when the Communist attack was launched, we suddenly threw in ill trained and ill equipped troops to check the invading hordes with the result that we came very close to complete defeat in that area. In the end, the courage and vigor of our fighting forces stemmed the tide and we were able to hold the enemy at bay even when they were reinforced by the Chinese army. But political and diplomatic blunders have prevented our achieving a real military victory. We have reached a hopeless impasse, while the enemy has been slowly but surely building up defensive and offensive potential.

It is clear that our government has been guilty of colossal and abysmal failures in the field of international relations since 1945. Some of these failures were due to the fact our responsible leaders grossly miscalculated the intentions and the capabilities of the Communist powers. In spite of the fact that the Communist leaders have frequently and definitely declared that they were actively working for the communization of the whole world, our leaders refused to believe them, and were startled when Communist efforts to seize power in country after country became apparent. Our leaders refused to believe that the Communists were capable of carrying out their expansionist schemes, even when these schemes became obvious to every casual observer.

The inability of our leaders to understand the intentions and capabilities of the Communists in the Far East is especially noteworthy. For several years the dominant clique in the Far Eastern section of our State Department refused to admit that the Chinese Communists were really Communists. The public was given to understand that the so-called Chinese Communists were merely agrarian reformers, or forward looking liberals, who were anxious to cooperate with the democratic powers. Yet all during this period it was clear to serious and dispassionate observers that the Chinese Communists were clearly and admittedly wholehearted Communists, closely tied up with the Kremlin crowd, and aimed at the total communization of the whole of the Far East. Our leaders were equally incompetent when it came to estimating the capabilities of the Chinese Communists. Even in 1947 our Department of State declared that there was no danger of China falling into Communist hands for another twenty years.

It is clear that much of our failure in international affairs was due to incompetence, the inability of our leaders to understand or to cope with the major problems which confronted us. But it also becomes increasingly clear that our failures were aggravated by the fact that disloyal elements had infiltrated into several of our government agencies. The number of actively disloyal persons was comparatively small, but they were able to do an enormous amount of damage. In IMS much of our power and prestige was due to the fact that we alone were possessors of the secret of the atomic bomb. It has now been clearly proved that several American citizens, working in connection with various atomic energy projects, gave or sold extremely important items of information to the Soviet authorities. This is undoubtedly one of the reasons why the USSR has made such rapid strides in developing its own atomic bomb. It has also been clearly proved that several persons occupying high and responsible positions in the government were, at one time or another, active members of Communist cells, and that such persons perjured themselves when they denied this fact.

Of even greater importance and significance was a group of "fellow travellers," persons who never joined the Communist party, persons who are horrified when accused of treason or disloyalty, but who joyfully fol-

-vii-

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