McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
The Record of Dean Acheson

THE principal target of your crticism has been Dean Acheson. Will you give the record -- not year opinion -- to prove that Acheson has aided the Communist cause?

Following is the documented record of Acheson's aid to international Communism over the past 20 years.

On the opposite page there is reproduced a confidential memorandum from a subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee in 1947 to the then Secretary of State, George Marshall. It will be noted that the Senate subcommittee warned that "under the administration of Dean Acheson" there was being carried out "a deliberate, calculated program . . . to protect Communist personnel in high places." The memorandum included the names of 10 State Department officials and warned that "the network extends into the office of the Assistant Secretary Benton [now Senator Benton]."

This warning was disregarded by Marshall.

Communist Russia Hires Acheson and Pressman

Before Russia was recognized by the United States in 1933, Dean Acheson was paid by the Soviet Union to act as Stalin's lawyer in this country.43 Lee Pressman, an admitted member of the Communist Party, also was on Stalin's payroll as one of his American lawyers.44 Some of Acheson's duties were to appear before such agencies as the U. S. Tariff Commission.45

Felix Wittmer, in the American Mercury asks:

"Just why among all the American lawyers, did the Soviet leaders hire these two: Acheson and Lee Pressman? It's easy to explain why they hired Pressman: he was a Communist and a member of the Ware cell organized for espionage in the government. The Soviet, Union, of course, followed a general policy in all countries of hiring sympathetic lawyers. Then why did Stalin hire Acheson?"46

This has never yet been satisfactorily explained by our Secretary of State whose job it is to "fight" the Communist threat to this country.

Communist Infiltration of Government Commences

Acheson first entered the government in 1933, when he was appointed Under Secretary of the Treasury. It was in 1933 also that the Communist Party began the systematic infiltration of our government under the direction of Harold Ware, son of Ella Reeve Bloor, the socalled "mother" of the American Communist Party. Alger Hiss, in those early days, was a member of the Ware cell. The far-reaching importance of this Communist cell in the U. S. government was described by Whittaker Chambers who said that its members have "helped to shape the future of every American now alive and indirectly affected the fate of every man now in uniform."47

After leaving the Treasury Department, Acheson served in the Attorney General's office for one year. In 1941 he entered the State Department.

Vouched for Hiss in 1941 When Told Hiss was a Communist

Adolph Berle, the State Department official in charge of security, has testified that he notified Acheson (both before and after Acheson became Assistant Secretary of State) of a conversation he had in 1939 with Whittaker Chambers about Alger Hiss and his brother, Donald. Chambers had advised Berle that the Hiss brothers were underground Communists. Assistant Secretary of State Berle's notes on Chambers' knowledge of the Hiss brothers' Communist activities were headed "Underground Espionage Agent."48 At the time Berle warned Acheson, Acheson ridiculed the fears of this State Department security officer and stated that he "could vouch for them absolutely."

Following is Berle's testimony before the House Committee on Un-American Activities:

"Specifically, I checked with Dean Acheson and later I checked when Acheson became Assistant Secretary of State [ 1941] and Alger Hiss became his executive assistant. That, to the best of my knowledge, was the first time when Hiss would have been in a position to do anything effective. Acheson said he had known the family and these two boys from childhood and could vouch for them absolutely."49

Ignored Reports on Hiss

Acheson ignored loyalty reports on Alger Hiss and continued to help him up the ladder of success. It is interesting to note that Hiss' meteoric rise in government began alter Acheson was advised that Hiss had been named as an underground Communist.

Hiss moved up the ladder, first becoming attached to the Office of Far Eastern Affairs. Next he became Special Assistant to the Adviser on Political Relations; Special Assistant to the Office of Special Political Affairs; Deputy Director, Office of Special Political Affairs; and finally Director, Office of Special Political Affairs.50

In addition Acheson helped secure for Hiss the appointment as Executive Secretary of the Dumbarton Oaks Conference, which laid the foundation for the United Nations.

Sends Hiss to Yalta

At Yalta, Hiss was one of the chief advisers to the

____________________
43
American Mercury Magazine, "Freedom's Case Against Dean Acheson", Felix Wittmer , April 1952, p. 8; Congressional Record, May 16, 1933, p. 3494.
44
House Un-American Activities Committee, Hearings on Communism in the United States, Pt. 2, August 23, 1950, pp. 2342-2901.
45
American Mercury, April, 1952, p. 5.
46
American Mercury, April 1952, pp. 5, 6.
47
Whittaker Chambers, Saturday Evening Post, "I was The Witness", February 23, 1952, p. 22.
48
Whittaker Chambers, Witness (Random House, 1952), pp. 466-469.
49
Hearing on Communist Expionage in United States, House Committee on Un-American Activities, August 30, 1943, pp. 1291-1300.
50
Letter from Department of State to Library of Congress. (Author has copy).

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