McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
Ambassador Philip C. Jessup
You have dated that Philip Jessup is unfit to hold ble job as Ambassador-at-Large and delegate to the United Nation because of his "affinity for Communist causes." What evidence did you present to the Senate subcommitee on Jessup?Following are highlights of the evidence that was submitted in the Jessup case:
1. Photostats, showing his connection with six organizations officially cited as fronts for and doing the work of the Communist Party. The citations were either by the Attorney General or by legislative committees.
2. Photostats of some of the checks totaling $60,000 of Communist money contributed to the Institute of Pacific Relations, which was headed by Jessup for a numher of years. The uncontradicted evidence before the McCarran committee shown that the institute was largely run by Jessup, Owen Lattimore, and Communist Frederick V. Field.
3. Sworn testimony before various Congressional committees identifying as members of the Communist Party and as espionage agents a sizable number of individuals on Jessup's staff and writers hired by the IPR while Jessup was chairman of the Pacific and American councils of the IPR.
4. Excerpts from Jeasup's writings showing he followed the Communist Party line in taking the inconsistent position of urging that we send arms to the Communist elements in Spain and later that we withhold arms from England and France during the Hitler-Stalin pact.
5. Testimony given under oath by Jessup in the second Him trial showing his continued support of Hiss after the facts on Hiss' Communist activities were made known in the first trial, together with Jessup's sworn testimony before the Tydings committee in which he continued to support Alger Him after his conviction.
6. Reproduction of a petition signed by Jessup in which Jessup followed the Communist Party line and recommended that the United States stop manufacturing atomic bombs, and destroy atomic-bomb material by dumping it into the ocean. This was at a time when atomic spies, such as Fuchs, were stealing our atomic secrets and passing them on to Russia who was even then manufacturing atomic bombs.
7. Reproduction of letters from IPR files and excerpts from sworn testimony showing Jessup's close relationship with Communist Frederick V. Field and his support of Field in his Communist activities.
8. Reproduction of a letter showing that an Amerasia defendant, Andrew Roth, who was named as a Communist, was "rated very highly by Jessup."
9. Reproduction of sworn testimony showing that Jessup urged that Red China be recognixed.191

After hearing your evidence on Jessup, what action did the Senate Committee take?

After hearing my evidence and a considerable amount of additional evidence, the Senate subcommittee recommended against James confirmation as delegate to the United Nations. The Senate did not confirm Jessup.

What did the President do after the Senate subcommittee found that Jessup was unfit to serve as the United States delegate to the United Nations?

After the Senate left Washington, the President reappointed Jessup as delegate to the United Nations, where he served during the entire conference, 12 weeks and 5 days, without Senate confirmation.

You dated that the Senate did not confirm Jessup for his United Nations job. Was this because the Senate did not have time to vote on Jessup, as Jessup has claimed?

No. Jessup was one of 10 individuals nominated by the President as delegates to the United Nations conference in Paris. Nine of the 10 were confirmed by a vote of the Senate. The Democratic leaders, however, refused to bring James name to the Floor for a vote because after an in, formal poll they found that Jessup could not secure enough votes for confirmation.

On January 17,1952, Russian Foreign Minister Vishinsky speaking at the UN meeting in Paris had this to say about Jessup; "I learned the other day with some dismay that 37 Senators had asked the United States Government if it would dismiss Mr. Jessup from here because he was rather sympathetically inclined toward an un-American way of thought . . . I must express my sympathy for Mr. Jessup."192

Of what significance was Ambassador Jessup's Defense of Alger Hiss?

Jessup testified in Hiss' behalf at both the Him trials. In 1950 when Jessup was questioned on this by Senator Hickenlooper before the Tydings Committee, he dated he saw no reason to change his testimony as to Hiss' reputation for integrity, truthfulness, honesty and loyalty.193

This tied in closely with Acheson's action in calling a press conference after Hiss was convicted and announcing to the press and the country that he would never turn his back on Alger Hiss, even after Hiss was convicted of perjury in connection with the treason which may well

____________________
191
Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Hearings on Nomination of Philip Jessup, Sept. 37, 1951, pp. 1-39; Oct. 2, 1951, pp. 41-102, 106-142.
192
New York Times, January 18, 1952, p. C-5.
193
Tydings Committee Hearings, Pt. 1, March 20, 1950, p, 267.

-53-

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