McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
The Evidence on Owen Lattimore.
Senstor McCarthy, during the Tydings committee hearings you stated that you were willling to stand or fall on the Lattimore canse. What evidence has been produced in his case?Thirteen different witnesses have testified under oath to Lattimore's Communist membership or party line activities.* Some of the testimony and evidence follows.Used by Russian Ingelligence Agents(1) Alexander Bamine, a former Russian General, was attached to Soviet Military Intelligence for 14 years. He renounced Communism and escaped to the United States. As result he is now under sentence of death by a Russian court. General Barmine testified under oath as follows:
-- that Owen Lattimore was a member of Russian Military Intelligence.194
-- that at one time General Berzin, the head of Russion Military Intelligence, had agreed to lend Lattimore to General Barmine for a secret Soviet project in China, which consisted of shipping to China Russian military equipment falsely labeled as truck parts for storage in Chinese warehouses for later use by the Chinese Communists.195
-- that it was later decided that Lattimore could not be spared for the Chinese project but should be kept in his more important position in the Institute of Pacific Relations which was being used as a "cover shop for Soviet military intelligence work in the Pacific area."196

Considered Top Member by American Communist Party

(2) Louis Budenz, former editor of the Daily Worker. the official publication of the Communist Party, testified that Lattimore was considered by the Communist Politburo in this country as a top functionary of the Communist Party. Budenz testified that Jack Stachel told him to "consider Owen Lattimore as a Communist."197 Budenz identified Stachel as follows, "Jack Stachel has been for years the most important Communist in the U. S. for allacround activity. He was one of the small commission of five which was in constant touch with Moscow."198

"Principal Agent of Stalinism"

(3) David N. Rowe, professor of Political Science at Yale University, a lieutenant colonel in military intelligence reserve, and consultant to Air Force intelligence, has testified under oath that "as of today among Far Eastern specialists in the United States, Lattimore is probably the principal agent of Stalinism."199

American Communist Party Notified of Official Party Line Change Through Owen Lattimore

(4) Louis Budenz has further testified that the American Politburo learned of an important Communist Party line change on China in 1943 through Frederick V. Field who stated he received those instructions from Lattimore. Budenz testified under oath that:

"Mr. Field just returned from a trip and I get the impression that he had talked to Mr. Lattimore personally, and Mr. Lattimore anted that information coming to him from the international Communist apparatus where he was located indicated that there was to be a change of line very sharply on Chiang Kai-shek, that is to say, that the negative opposition to Chiang Kai-shek was to change to a positive opposition and that more stress was to be put upon attacking Chiang Kai-shek."200

Budenz testified that the Communist Party in this country checked the accuracy of this important party, line change and Moscow confirmed the instructions.201

Under Disciplinary Power of Communist Party

(5) Budenz further testified that he received orders from Communist Party leaders to treat Lattimore in the Daily Worker as a party member under Communist Party discipline.202 After identifying Lattimore as "under Communist Party discipline," Budenz went on to say:

"Now in this respect there are Communist Party members, those who are smaller people, and out-andout Communists under discipline.

"These Communists under discipline since 1939 or 1940, since the Hider-Stalin Pact, are ordered not to have any vestige of membership about them, except in exceptional instances where the Politburo decides otherwise . . . "203

Secret Communist Orders Bore Lattimore's Symbol "XL"

(6) According to sworn testimony before the Tydings Committee, highly secret Communist Party documents, including reports to Moscow, often bore Lattimore's Communist Party identification symbols, which were "L" and "XL."

The testimony was that those reports were written on onion-skin paper with orders that they be destroyed after reading. People in key or delicate positions were desig-

____________________
*
Louis Budenz, Freda Utley. General Alexander Barmise, Igor Bogolepov, Newton Steely. Professor Kenneth Cologrove, Dr. Karl Wittfogel, Ambassador William Bullitt, Governor Harold Stassen. Professor David Rowe, Professor William McGovern, Eugene Dooman, Frank Farrell. Harvey Matusow.
194
194 McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 1, July 31, 1951, p. 201
195
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 1, July 31, 1951, p. 197-200.
196
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 1, July 31, 1951, p. 201-202.
197
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 2, Aug. 22, 1951, pp. 552, 553; Tydings Committee Hearings, Ot. 1, Aoruk 20, 1950, p. 403.
198
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 2. Aug. 22. 1951, p. 565.
199
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, March 27, 1952, (now being printed).
200
Tydings Committee Hearings, Pt. 1, April 20, 1950, p. 492; Macarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 2, Aug. 22, 1951, p, 529.
201
Tydings Committee Hearings, Pt. 1, April 20, 1950, p. 492; Macarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 2, Aug. 22, 1951, p, 529.
202
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 2, Aug. 22, 1951, pp. 553, 553.
203
Tydings Committee Hearings, Pt. 1, April 20, 1950, p. 504.

-57-

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