McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
General George C. Marshall

Why did you spend so much time preparing the Marshall speach -- espeeially in view of the fact that you know it would be an unpopular speeeh?

A number of things contributed to my decision to write the history of General George Marshall.

Some of the reasons are set forth in the following passages of my book, "America's Retreat from Victory":

"My discussion of General Marshall's career arose naturally and inevitably out of a long and anxious study of the retreat from victory which this Administration has been beating since 1945. In company with so many of my fellow citizens I have become alarmed and dismayed over our moral and material enfeeblement.

"The fact that 152 million American people are officially asked by the in power to adopt Marshall's global strategy during a period of time when the life of our civilization hangs in the balance would seem to make it imperative that his complete record be subjected to the searching light of public scrutiny.

"As a backdrop for the history of Marshall which I gave on June 14th, there is the raw, harsh fact that since World War II the free world has been losing 100 million people per year to international Communism. If I had named the men responsible for our tremendous lose, all of the Administration apologists and the camp-following elements of press and radio led by the Daily Worker would have screamed 'the Big Lie,' 'irresponsible,' 'smear.' 'Congressional immunity,' etc., etc., etc.

"However, it was the Truman branch of the Democrat Party meeting at Denver, Colorado, which named the men responsible for the disaster which they called a 'great victory' -- Dean Gooderham Acheson and George Catlett Marshall. By what tortured reasoning they arrived at the conclusion that the loss of 100 million people a year to Communism was a 'great victory,' was unexplained.

"The general picture of our steady, constant retreat from victory, with the same men always found at the time and place where disaster strikes America and success comes to Soviet Russia, would inevitably have caused me, or someone else deeply concerned with the history of this time, to document the acts of those molding and shaping the history of the world over the past decade. However, an occurrence during the Mac- Arthur investigation was the immediate cause of my decision to give the Senate and the country the history of Marshall.

"A deeply disturbed Senator from the Russell Committee came to my office for information. 'McCarthy,' he said, 'I have always considered Marshall as one of our great heroes and I am sure that he would knowingly do no wrong. But, McCarthy,' he said, 'tell we who prejudiced the thinking of this great? Why, or example, did he keep from Roosevelt the completed correct intelligence reports at Yalta? Why did he, as Roosevelt's military adviser, approve that Yalta agreement which was drafted by Hiss, Gromyko and Jebb? Who perwaded him at Yalta to disregard the intelligence report of 50 of his own officers, all with the rank of colonel or above -- an intelligence report which urged a course directly contra to what was done at Yalta and confirmed at Potsdam?'

"He handed a copy of that report to me and asked: 'Why did a man of Marshall's intelligence ignore such a report as this compiled by 50 of his own top intelligence officers?'

"The Senator went on. 'McCarthy,' he said, 'who of evil allegiance to the Kremlin sold him on the disastrous Marshall Mission to China, where Marshall described one of his own acts as follows: "As Chief-of- Staff I armed 39 anti-Communist divisions. Now with a stroke of a pen I disarm them."

'When that was done,' he asked, 'who then persuaded Marshall to open Kalgan Mountain Pass, with the result that the Chinese Communists could make contact with the Russians and receive the necessary arms and ammunition to overrun all of China?'

'McCarthy, who on earth could have persuaded Marshall to side with Acheson and against American interests on the question of Formosa and the use of the Chinese Nationalist troops?'

"Upon searching for the answers for the Senator, I found to my surprise that no one had ever written the history of Marsball -- Marshall, who, by the alchemy of propaganda became the 'greatest living American' and the recently proclaimed 'master of global strategy' by and for the party in power. In view of the fact that the committee, the Congress, and the American people were being called upon either to endorse or reject Marashall's' 'global strategy,' I felt it was urgent that such a study he made and submitted to Congress and the people."

Marshall's First Attempt to Make General

Another thing which particularly interested me in Marshall's history was the unusual story of his promotions and rise to power. For example, General Pershing unsuccessfully attempted to have Marshall given a generalship 15 years after World War I. According to Walter Trohan's article, "The Tragedy of George Marshall", Marshall grew impatient over slow promotion and sought the intercession of General Pershing with General Douglas MacArthur who was Chief of Staff. As Trohan puts it:

" MacArthur was read to oblige, but insisted that the promotion go through regular channels. Pershing agreed, confident Marshall could clear the hurdles. Friendly examination of the Marshall record showed what his superiors regarded as insufficient time with troops. MacArthur proposed to remedy this, giving him command of the Eighth Regiment at Fort Screven, Georgia, one of the finest regiments in the Army.

Army Inspector General Rejected Promotion for Mershall

" Marshall was moved up from Lieutenant Colonel, but his way to a General's stars appeared to be blocked forever when the Inspector General reported that under one year of Marshall's command the English Regiment had dropped from one of the best regiments in the Army to one of the worst. MacArthur regretfully informed Pershing that the report

-67-

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