McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
The Smear

What is the reason for the viciously intense amear attack which has been waged against you since you started to dig Communists out of government?

The official Communist Party line is to destroy the reputation of anyone who dares to expose any of their undercover Communists. Lenin long ago established this Communist role when he said:

"We can and must write in a language which sows among the masses hate, revulsion, scorn and the like, toward those who who disagree with us."292

The purpose of this Communist tactic is two-fold: (1) to smear and discredit the individual so that his evidence on traitors will not be believed and (2) to discourage others from entering the fight.

In this the Communists have been singularly successful. Time and again, men in the field of politics, writing, religion, and education who have spoken out against specific Communists have found themselves bitterly attacked, smeared out of office, and prevented from getting jobs.293

Louis Budenx, who for years was editor of the Communist Daily Worker, gave the Justice Department the names of 400 secret members of the Communist Party who are engaged in newspaper and radio work. He explained that one of the major aims of the Communist Party was to infiltrate as many newspapers and radio stations as possible so as to be able to twist and distort the new along the Communist Party line. It is very important to the Party that the Communists handling news in press and radio remain concealed, secret members of the Party because once their membership is known they can do but little damage.

In this connection, the following testimony of Igor Bagolepov, former Colonel in the Red Army who worked with Russian intelligence, is of interest:

"Once I read a memorandum written by Molotov in our secret files where the problem was discussed of our participation and utilization of the Western press. I have to explain that before 1931 it was a general rule that the Communists should not write in the foreign press. It was a shame. It was a disgrace. But Trotsky was expelled from the Soviet Union and he had written articles against Stalin in the Daily Express, and these articles became very popular because they were written in the British newspaper.

"This gave the idea to the Soviet authorities that it was wrong to seek only the Communist papers. In the memorandum of Molotov which evidently laid down the foundation for the new trend of Soviet policy, written in 1931, it was stated, Who Reads the Communist Papers? Only a few people who are already Communists. We don't need to propagandise them. What is our object? Who do we have to influence? We have to influence non-Communists if we want to make them Communists or if we want to fool them. So we have to try to infiltrate in the big press, to influence millions of people, and not merely hundreds of thousands.

"After this argumentation the position was taken that we had to change drastically our policy, as I said before and do our best in order to carry out the Communist ideas through non-Communist press." (Emphasis mine.)294

It has been claimed by some that instead of hurting the Communist cause you have sided it. How can the average American, who does not have access to all the records, decide whether you have helped or hurt the Communist cause?

To determine whether I have been hurting the Communists, we should perhaps refer to the Communist press. One of the principal functions of the Daily Worker, according to all the evidence, is to notify all loyal Communist writers, news commentators, etc., what the official Communist Party line is.

Louis Budenz, former editor of the Daily Worker, testified:

"The Daily Worker is not a daily paper in the normal sense of the word. It is the telegraph agency of the conspiracy giving directives to the conspirators.

". . . It parades under the guise of a daily paper in order to protect itself through the cry of freedom of the press, but it is not concerned primarily with how much circulation it has . . .

"Its concern is to get out every day to the Communists throughout the country, the active ones, the instructions upon which they are to act."295

"Every time the Daily Worker arrives in the district office of the Communist Party it is read immediately by the district leader. He calls together his staff, and he assigns to them their tasks as a result of the Daily Worker articles and editorials."296

How did the Communist Party order its membership in press and radio to handle the issue of Senator McCarthy vs. Communists in the State Department?

The national secretary of the Communist Party, Gus Hall, who has since been jailed for his Communist activitics, advised all Communist Party members as follows in the Daily Worker of May 4, 1950:

"I urge all Communist Party members, and all antifascists, to yield second place to none in the fight to rid our country of the fascist poison of Mc- Carthyism."

On April 5, 1950, the Daily Worker had this to say:

"Communists are keenly aware of the damage the McCarthy crowd is doing. They recognize that the McCarthy objective is destruction of the Bill of

____________________
292
Quoted by Max Eastman, Saturday Evening Post, November 8, 1949.
293
For more details information on this see Eugene Lyons' article in American Legion Magazine, September, 1951.
294
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, April 7, 1952 (now being printed.)
295
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 2, Aug. 22, 1951, p. 515.
296
McCarran Committee Hearings on IPR, Pt. 3, Aug. 23, 1961, p. 601.

-85-

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