McCarthyism: The Fight for America

By Joe McCarthy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
The Evil Genius

You claim that Communism is evil. Why do hundreds of millions of people submit to Communist rule?

To answer this question I call upon Stanislaw Mikolajczyk, prime minister of Poland before its fall to Communist Russia, who personally witnessed the dark evil cloud of Communism blot out the sunlight over his nation.

In the Preface of his book, The Rape of Poland, Mr. Mikolajczyk earnestly asks Americans to learn the lesson that Poland learned too late.

"A raging question in Poland has become, 'How longwill it take them to conanunize us completely?'

"To my mind, however, the question is badly framed. I am convinced that human beings cannot be converted to Communism if that conversion is attempted while the country concerned is under Communist rule. Under Communist dictatorship the majority become slaves -- but men born in freedom, though they may be coerced, can never be convinced. Communism is an evil which is embraced only by fools and idealists not under the actual heel of such rule.

"The question should be phrased: How long can a nation under Communist rule survive the erosion of its soul?

"Never before in history has there been such an organized attempt to demoralize men and whole nations as has been made in Communist-dominated countries. People there are forced to lie in order to go on living; to hate instead of love; to denounce their own patriots and natural leaders and their own ideas. The outside world is deceived by Communist misuse of the organs of true democracy, true patriotism -- even, when necessary, true Christianity.

"Who rules Poland today, and by what means? The answer is as complex as the nature of Communism itself.

"The pattern of Communist rule in Poland goes back to 1939, when Molotov and Ribbentrop agreed to partition my country. After stabbing Poland in the back while Hitler was engaging the Polish Army in the west, the Communists established their iron rule in the east of Poland. This de facto rule was tacitly recognized in the conference rooms of Teheran and Yalta.

"Therefore it is important to recognize the real aims of the Communist, his methods, the pattern of Soviet aggression.

"By October, 1947, the month in which I began my flight freedom, the Communists ruled Poland through secret groups, open groups, Security Police -- including special Communist units called the Ormo, the military, the Army, Special Commissions, and Soviet-patterned National Councils. A million well-armed men were being used to subjugate 23,- 000,000. Control of all top commands was -- and remains -- completely in the hands of Russians. Their orders, even some of the more savage ones, were and are now being carried out by Poles. These Poles are either Communists or men of essentially good heart whose, has at long last snapped. They are mainly chosen from among the 1,500,000 Poles transferred by Stalin to Russia in 1939. Stalin has 'prepared' them thoroughly for their work.

"The American reader who scans, these words while sitting comfortably in a strong, free country may wonder at many aspects of Poland's debasement. He may wonder, why the nation did not revolt against the Communistic minority which has enslaved it. On the other hand, he may wonder why Russia needed two and a half years to impose its rule. Or why Russia went to the trouble of camouflaging its aggression during much of that period.

"But the Communist minority has gained absolute control simply because it alone possessed modern arms. History reveals instances where a mob of a hundred thousand, armed with little more than rocks and fists, has overcome despotic rule by one assault on a key city or sector. Today is another day. If the despot owns several armored cars, or even a modest number of machine guns, he can rule. The technology of terror has risen far beyond the simple vehemence of a naked crowd.

"We in Poland fell -- for this reason and for many others. We fell even before the war had ended because we were sacrificed by our allies, the United State and Great Britain. We fell because we become isolated from the Western world, for the Russian zone of Germany lay to our west, and Russia leaned heavily on the door to the east. In the morbid suspicions of the Kremlin, the plains of Poland had become a smooth highway over which the armor of the west might someday roll. Thus, much of our nation must be incorporated into the USSR. and the rest must be made to produce cannon fodder to resist such an advance. We fell because the Russians had permitted -- indeed, they encouraged -- the Germans to destroy Warsaw. In the average European country, the capital remains heart, soul, and source of the nation's spirit. Our capital was murderously crushed: its wreckage became not alone the wreckage of a city but the debris of a nation.

"We fell because while so many of our best youths were dying while fighting with the Allies, so many of the people who knew the dream of independence were slaughtered and so many who constituted the backbone of our economy were herded like cattle into Germany or Russia. We fell because Russia stripped us of our industrial and agricultural wealth, calling it 'war booty.'

"We lasted two and a half years because we were the largest nation being ground down to fragments behind the Iron Curtain. We held out because we are a romantic people who can endure much if the prospect of liberty remains on the horizon. We lasted because the deeply ingrained religion of the country brought solace and hope. We existed because, through centuries of hardship; we have learned to fend, to recognize the tactics of terror and propaganda. We held out because the Poles have loathed the concept of Communism since it first showed its head, and because the strong-armed bands of Communism -- strong as they were -- were still not huge

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
McCarthyism: The Fight for America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.