Big Steel and the Wilson Administration: A Study in Business-Government Relations

By Melvin I. Urofsky | Go to book overview

V
WARTIME CONTROL AND CO-OPERATION

F ROM 1917 TO 1918, THE KEY WORD TO UNDERSTANDING the relations between the Government and the steel industry was "co-operation." War required an efficient integration of all the energies of the country. The writings and speeches of government and industrial officials throughout this period played upon themes that equated competition with waste and co-operation with efficiency.1 Waste, it was claimed, not only drained the nation's strength, but was irrational; conversely, rationality in industry aided efficiency and should be encouraged. Business men who for years had preached co-operation now welcomed its widespread acceptance by federal officials. Harry A. Wheeler, president of the United States Chamber of Commerce, declared in the summer of 1917 that the war "is giving business the foundation for the kind of co-operative effort that alone can make the United States economically efficient."2 According to

____________________
1
Bernard M. Baruch, American Industry in the War: A Report of the War Industries Board ( New York, 1941), p. 29; Charles W. Baker, Government Control and Operation of Industry in Great Britain and the United States During the World War ( New York, 1921), pp. 22-23.
2
Henry A. Wheeler, "Putting Our Resources on Top," The Nation's Business, VI ( August, 1918), 10.

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Big Steel and the Wilson Administration: A Study in Business-Government Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Contents xix
  • Prologue xxi
  • I- The Rise and Fall of an Entente 1
  • II- Big Steel and the New Freedom 37
  • III- War Prosperity, Preparedness, and Neutrality 84
  • IV- Josephus Daniels and the Armor Trust 117
  • V- Wartime Control and Co-Operation 152
  • VI- Price Fixing by Co-Operation 192
  • VII- Conflict over Labor 248
  • VIII- Reconstruction 292
  • Epilogue- The Triumph of Big Steel 334
  • Bibliography 345
  • Index 357
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