Counterrevolution: U.S. Foreign Policy

By Regula Boorstein; Edward Boorstein | Go to book overview

2. China

The first great revolution after World War II was the Chinese Revolution. Any honest study will show that it was a natural outgrowth of Chinese history and circumstances. China had been in turmoil, in the throes of a developing revolutionary process, for over a hundred years. The imperialist countries-- Great Britain, Japan, Russia, Germany, France, the United States --had inflicted countless humiliations on China and had turned it into a semi-colony, enjoying little real independence. The peasants, the bulk of the population, suffered under an age-old feudal landholding system; they had to turn over a large part of what they produced to landlords. Even when there were no special calamities, the people of China did not get enough to eat, and periodically widespread famines struck. The Chinese government was corrupt, incompetent, repressive, unable to command the loyalty of not only the people but its own armies. On top of everything else came World War II, which aggravated the crisis and speeded up its development.

Faced after the War with the developing Chinese revolution, the U.S. Government didn't ask itself whether a revolution was necessary, or which side represented the Chinese people, or what U.S. policy would be in the best interests of its own people. It was promoting imperialist interests and automatically supported the Chiang Kai-shek side that was defending the rotten social system and government against the people. It intervened, providing money, arms, advice, and political and moral support. When the revolution triumphed, a coalition of the China Lobby and right wing Republicans raised the question "Who lost China?" and the cry of treason.

-54-

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Counterrevolution: U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1. Russia/Soviet Union: 1917-1946 3
  • 2. China 54
  • 3. Cuba 91
  • 4. Vietnam 134
  • 5. Nicaragua 167
  • 6. Central and Southern Africa Congo-Zaire, Angola, Namibia, South Africa 199
  • 7. Soviet Union: 1946-Early 1990 242
  • Conclusion 300
  • Notes 319
  • Index 335
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