Counterrevolution: U.S. Foreign Policy

By Regula Boorstein; Edward Boorstein | Go to book overview

6. Central and Southern Africa Congo-Zaire, Angola, Namibia, South Africa

The first important U.S. intervention in Africa was in the Congo, an ex-Belgian colony that won independence in 1960, confronting U.S. officials with what they viewed as the threat of a "communist takeover." The United States was concerned about the Congo not only because of its size and its copper, uranium, and diamonds, but because of its strategic location in central Africa. If it became "another Cuba," it could infect the whole continent.

The Belgians had hoped to maintain control even after independence, but they had not reckoned with the energetic action of the Congolese prime minister, Patrice Lumumba, organizer and leader of the Mouvement National Congolais. Lumumba informed the Congolese people of what was happening by frequent radio speeches and reports to Parliament. He warned that "the political independence they have given us with their left hand they want to take away with their right hand through economic domination." He explained the maneuvers of the imperialists. "Those who covet our riches are attempting to provoke anarchy, demoralize the members of our government... turn the population against us and make our government fall. They propose to use puppets who will not hesitate to blindly sign any kind of agreement to place the Congo under foreign domination." 1

Lumumba was an anti-imperialist, a person who wanted the Congolese to be masters of their own country. At an All-African Peoples' Conference in Ghana in 1958, he had called for an end to the domination and injustices of colonialism, for indepen-

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Counterrevolution: U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1. Russia/Soviet Union: 1917-1946 3
  • 2. China 54
  • 3. Cuba 91
  • 4. Vietnam 134
  • 5. Nicaragua 167
  • 6. Central and Southern Africa Congo-Zaire, Angola, Namibia, South Africa 199
  • 7. Soviet Union: 1946-Early 1990 242
  • Conclusion 300
  • Notes 319
  • Index 335
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