The Bush Presidency: First Appraisals

By Bert A. Rockman; Colin Campbell | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
For their contrasting views of Dwight Eisenhower's skills as a political leader, see Richard E. Neustadt, Presidential Power ( New York: Wiley, 1960); and Fred I. Greenstein, The Hidden-Hand Presidency: Eisenhower as Leader ( New York: Basic Books, 1982).
2.
For further discussions of this thesis, see Larry Berman, "Looking Back on the Reagan Presidency", in Looking Back on the Reagan Presidency, ed. Larry Berman ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990), 3-17; and Joel D. Aberbach and Bert A. Rockman with Robert M. Copeland, "From Nixon's Problem to Reagan's Achievement: The Federal Executive Reexamined", in Berman, Looking Back, 175-94.
3.
See David Hoffman, "Bush: Making Himself Up as He Goes Along", Washington Post, 13 August 1989, B1, B4.
4.
Despite opposition from right-wing gurus, Bush signed off on the appointment of former Dukakis adviser Lawrence Summers to chief economist of the World Bank. In the view of columnist David Warsh "Summers's appointment . . . symbolizes faith on the part of the president that the mainstream economics consensus knows something, that politics is ultimately secondary to technique and the dispassionate search for truth. It is further evidence that what the Bush presidency is about is the rebuilding of the American establishment." David Warsh, "World Bank Appointment Shows Bush's Faith in the Dispassionate Search for Truth", Washington Post, 31 October 1990, B3.
5.
Ann Devroy, "Defending Military Budget, Bush Calls for Cautious Response to Soviet Shifts", Washington Post, 8 February 1990, A30.
6.
Nominated in Tower's place was a highly regarded member of the House of Representatives, Dick Cheney, and in Lucas's place, John R. Dunne, an experienced trial lawyer.
7.
David Hoffman, "Bush's Evolution: Hesitation to Activism on Soviet Changes", Washington Post, 11 March 1990, A34.
8.
Sitzkrieg, literally "sitting war," was the German word used to describe the passive military posture of British and French forces on the Western Front of Germany following the Anglo-French joint declaration of war on Germany that commenced with its invasion of Poland on 1 September 1939. The Sitzkrieg lasted until the Nazi forces invaded France nine months later.
9.
See Robin Toner, "Democrats, Albeit Late, Ponder Presidential Bid", New York Times, 3 December 1990, A-16.
10.
Looking at survey data on the public's attitudes toward the use of military force in support of President Bush's objectives to get Saddam Hussein to withdraw from Kuwait, Thomas Mann concludes that "when you do the breakdowns and when you follow up the sanctions question it indicates that a substantial majority, on the order of two-thirds, entertains the use of military force to get Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait." As quoted in Richard Morin, "Two Ways of Reading the Public's Lips on Gulf Policy: Differently Phrased Questions Seem to Yield Contradictory Results", Washington Post, 14 January 1991, A9.

-33-

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The Bush Presidency: First Appraisals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - The Leadership Style of George Bush 1
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Meeting Low Expectations: Strategy and Prospects of the Bush Presidency 37
  • Notes 65
  • 3 - Domestic Policy: Divided Government and Cooperative Presidential Leadership 69
  • Notes 89
  • 4 - Bush and the Post-Cold-War World: New Challenges for American Leadership 93
  • Notes 124
  • 5 - George Bush and the Public Presidency: the Politics of Inclusion 129
  • Notes 151
  • 6 - Governing Unheroically (and Sometimes Unappetizingly): Bush and the 101st Congress 155
  • Notes 183
  • 7 - The White House and Presidency Under the "Let's Deal" President 185
  • Notes 217
  • 8 - The President and the Executive Branch 223
  • Notes 244
  • 9 - Good Government and the Politics of High Exposure 249
  • Notes 283
  • 10 - Conclusion 287
  • Notes 295
  • Index 297
  • About the Authors 307
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