Measurement in Physical Education

By Donald K. Mathews; Nancy Allison Close | Go to book overview

chapter 9
nutritional measurements and somatotype

Influence on the development of strong, healthy bodies is greatest during the growing years. A primary cause of interruption of the normal growth cycle of children is nutritive deficiency. As a result of the pre-induction physical examination during World War II it was found that one-third of the draftees were unfit for military service directly or indirectly because of nutritional deficiencies.

Furthermore, studies conducted by the National Research Council have revealed that there is widespread prevalence of moderately deficient diets in the United States.8

The physical educator is in a vital position to detect and refer cases of possible malnutrition to the health or medical specialist. Because nutrition plays such an important role in the general physical fitness of the child this chapter is devoted to methods of appraising the nutritional status of the public school child.


Nutrition

According to Lusk, nutrition may be defined as the sum processes concerned with growth, maintenance, and repair of the living body as a whole or of its constituent parts.9 Nutrition deals with the individual cells of the body and the constant exchange of nutrients. Therefore, nutrition is primarily concerned with the supply of essential foodstuffs to all the

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Measurement in Physical Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter 1 Approach to Measurement and Evaluation 1
  • Bibliography 23
  • Chapter 2 Test Selection 25
  • Chapter 3 Analysis of Test Scores 33
  • Bibliography 71
  • Chapter 4 Measuring Strength 72
  • Bibliography 107
  • Chapter 5 Motor Fitness Tests 109
  • Bibliography 156
  • Chapter 6 General Motor Ability 157
  • Bibliography 201
  • Chapter 7 Sports Skill Testing 204
  • Bibliography 228
  • Chapter 8 Cardiovascular Tests 229
  • Bibliography 258
  • Chapter 9 Nutritional Measurements and Somatotype 260
  • Bibliography 295
  • Chapter 10 Evaluation of Body Mechanics 297
  • Introduction 297
  • Bibliography 336
  • Chapter 11 Evaluation of Social Development 338
  • Bibliography 358
  • Chapter 12 Sports Knowledge Tests 360
  • Bibliography 372
  • Chapter 13 Marking in Physical Education 374
  • Bibliography 390
  • Chapter 14 Organization and Administration of the Measurement Program 391
  • Bibliography 404
  • Appendix a Table of Square Roots of Numbers from 1 to 1000 405
  • Appendix B Suggested Laboratory Exercises 416
  • Appendix C the New Britain System 420
  • Appendix D Norms for Aahper Youth Fitness Test 428
  • Appendix E Norms for Kirchner Motor Fitness Test 452
  • Appendix F Norms for Oregon Motor Fitness Test 456
  • Index 463
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