Measurement in Physical Education

By Donald K. Mathews; Nancy Allison Close | Go to book overview

are the most commonly employed. The primary problem in using attitude scales is validity. The Adams scale for measuring attitude toward physical education is contained in this chapter and may be used with either high school or college students.

Perhaps one of the most recent and encouraging advances in techniques of evaluation in the area of social efficiency is the use of sociometry. This type of evaluation appears to be extremely well adapted for use in physical education because of the numerous group activities of which the program is composed. In identifying the overly aggressive, the rejected, and the leaders in a group, the instructor is made more aware of group structure and interaction, and hence is better equipped to organize groups effectively and to plan individual programs for those children in need of recognition or a feeling of belonging to the group.

This chapter could hardly be complete without the fine summary paragraph from Gladys Scott's article, "The Contributions of Physical Activity to Psychological Development."14

There is perhaps no area of our professional background that offers more challenge to us than psychological development. The challenge is multiple. We need a better background in general psychology, personality development, social psychology, and cultural anthropology. We need to develop research competencies in these areas and to pursue our understandings of prophylactic and therapeutic contributions of experiences in motor skills. As teachers and administrators, we must be ready to modify our practice in line with new evidence.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Adams, R. S.: "Two Scales for Measuring Attitude Toward Physical Education". Research Quart., March, 1963, p. 91.

2. Best, John W.: Research and Education. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, Prentice- Hall, Inc., 1959, p. 156.

3. Blanchard, B. E.: "A Behavior Frequency Rating Scale for the Measurement of Character and Personality in Physical Education Classroom Situations". Research Quart., Vol. 7, No. 2, May, 1936.

4. Bonney, Merl E., and Fessenden, Seth A.: Manual Bonney-Fessenden Sociograph. California Test Bureau, Los Angeles, California, 1955.

5. Bonney, Warren C., and Burleson, Reba M.: Socializing Techniques. J. A. A. Health, Phys. Educ. & Recreation, March, 1954.

6. Cowell, Charles C.: "The Contributions of Physical Activity to Psychological Development". Research Quart., 31:2, 286, Pt. II, March, 1960.

7. Jaeger, Eloise M., and Slocum, Helen M.: "Physical Education Teachers Contributions to Guidance in Minnesota Secondary Schools". Research Quart., Vol. 27, No. 1, March, 1956.

8. Jennings, Helen: Sociometry in Group Relations. American Council on Education, 1948.

9. Jones, Harold E.: Motor Performance and Growth. Berkeley, Calif., University of California Press, 1949.

-358-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Measurement in Physical Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter 1 Approach to Measurement and Evaluation 1
  • Bibliography 23
  • Chapter 2 Test Selection 25
  • Chapter 3 Analysis of Test Scores 33
  • Bibliography 71
  • Chapter 4 Measuring Strength 72
  • Bibliography 107
  • Chapter 5 Motor Fitness Tests 109
  • Bibliography 156
  • Chapter 6 General Motor Ability 157
  • Bibliography 201
  • Chapter 7 Sports Skill Testing 204
  • Bibliography 228
  • Chapter 8 Cardiovascular Tests 229
  • Bibliography 258
  • Chapter 9 Nutritional Measurements and Somatotype 260
  • Bibliography 295
  • Chapter 10 Evaluation of Body Mechanics 297
  • Introduction 297
  • Bibliography 336
  • Chapter 11 Evaluation of Social Development 338
  • Bibliography 358
  • Chapter 12 Sports Knowledge Tests 360
  • Bibliography 372
  • Chapter 13 Marking in Physical Education 374
  • Bibliography 390
  • Chapter 14 Organization and Administration of the Measurement Program 391
  • Bibliography 404
  • Appendix a Table of Square Roots of Numbers from 1 to 1000 405
  • Appendix B Suggested Laboratory Exercises 416
  • Appendix C the New Britain System 420
  • Appendix D Norms for Aahper Youth Fitness Test 428
  • Appendix E Norms for Kirchner Motor Fitness Test 452
  • Appendix F Norms for Oregon Motor Fitness Test 456
  • Index 463
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 470

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.