Studies in Ancient Yahwistic Poetry

By Frank Moore Cross Jr.; David Noel Freedman | Go to book overview

Notes to the Introduction
a.
This chapter is a slightly revised version of an article entitled "The Blessing of Moses", by Frank M. Cross Jr. and David Noel Freedman, which appeared in the Journal of Biblical Literature, LXVII ( 1948), pp. 191-210.
b.
U. Cassuto "Il cap. 33 del Deuteronomio e la festa del Capo d'anno nel' antico Israele," Revista degli Studi Orientali, XI ( 1928), pp. 233-253. Nevertheless, all treatments before 1944 have been antiquated by the new developments.
c.
T. H. Gaster, "An Ancient Eulogy on Israel: Deuteronomy 33:3-5, 26-29", JBL, LXVI ( 1947), pp. 53-62. R. Gordis has since published a criticism of this treatment, "The Text and Meaning of Deuteronomy 33:27", JBL, LXVII ( 1948), pp. 69-72. Gordis, for the most part, repeats material originally issued in 1933, "Critical Notes on the Blessing of Moses (Deut xxxiii)", JTS, XXXIV, pp. 390-392.

A brief note by H. L. Ginsberg in BASOR ♯110 ( 1948) may also be mentioned.

d.
Cf. W. J. Phythian-Adams, "On the Date of the 'Blessing of Moses'", JPOS, III ( 1923), pp. 158-166. He defends a similar date on wholly different grounds.
e.
The orthographic evidence tends to fix the tenth century as the terminus ad quem. The change from purely consonantal spelling to the general use of matres lectionis to indicate final vowels was complete in the ninth century. This should not be confused with the gradual introduction of internal vowel letters at a much later date.
f.
For comparisons with the Blessing of Jacob, and discussion of the literary category to which this poem belongs, see the introduction to the Blessing of Jacob, Chapter III.

-98-

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