Charles Dickens and Other Victorians

By Arthur Quiller-Couch | Go to book overview

DICKENS (IV)

PREFACE

I THINK it meet, Gentlemen, that before we resume our subject to-day, a word should be said on a loss that has befallen English letters in general and our sister-University in particular, since I last addressed you.

Walter Raleigh was an authentic son of Cambridge: and although he spent the most of his life teaching in other places the better understanding of a literature -- our own literature -- which in his undergraduate days had not found adqeuate recognition here, yet Cambridge had been his pasture, and he carried everywhere the mettle of that pasture: yes, and unmistakably, and although by the gay sincerity of his nature he would win men to like him, wherever he went.

Personal affection may count for too much in my faith that he will some day be recognised, not only for a true son of Cambridge, but for a great one in his generation. I put, however, that reckoning on one side. He did, very gaily and manfully and well, all the work that fell to his hand; and his end was in this wise. He had, in the first and second weeks of August, 1914, been eye-witness at Oxford of one of two amazing scenes -- the other simultaneously passing here -- when in these precincts, in these courts of unconscious preparation, by these two sacred streams, all on a sudden the spirit of youth was a host incorporate.

-62-

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Charles Dickens and Other Victorians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Dickens (i) 3
  • Dickens (ii) 24
  • Dickens (iii) 42
  • Dickens (iv) 62
  • Dickens (v) 81
  • Thackeray (i) 100
  • Thackeray (ii) 119
  • Thackeray (iii) 137
  • The Victorian Background 158
  • Disraeli 180
  • Mrs. Gaskell 199
  • Anthony Trollope - The Barsetshire Novels 219
  • Index 235
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