The Redemption of Democracy: The Coming Atlantic Empire

By Hermann Rauschning | Go to book overview

4
The Assimilation of the Revolution

WE HAVE HEARD a new speech by Churchill, of classic cast and with all his masterly skill at saying in the simplest words, in sentences of ageless perfection, exactly what weighs unspoken and inarticulate on every man's mind. Is it going too far to detect a Shakespearean touch in the words that can inspire alike the man in the street and the most cultivated intellect?

This nation does not need mass hypnosis or stimulation to mass psychosis in order to withstand the supreme test. There is no better sign of the soundness of this life and of the fact that the process of mass leveling has found its limit here. In his speeches we can see something like a positive opposite pole to the thing called propaganda, which has a negative pole in the malevolent, disintegrative demagogy that tempts the masses. Such demagogy is in the deepest sense wasteful husbandry, destroying spiritual forces, and therefore bound sooner or later to bring savage retribution upon the nation that succumbs to it. These speeches of Churchill's show that despite the revolt of the masses there is a language which appeals with intuitive accuracy to a nation with-

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The Redemption of Democracy: The Coming Atlantic Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part I 1
  • 1- The Steerage of the New Mayflower 3
  • 2- The Shattering of Security 9
  • 3- The Revolution of Nihilism is Universal 23
  • 4- The Very Heart of This War 33
  • 5- The Seafaring Democracies 41
  • Part II 61
  • 1- Hitler's Technique Again 63
  • 2- The New Social Basis 83
  • 3- The Unseen Revolution 107
  • 4- The Assimilation of the Revolution 129
  • 5- Leviathan 163
  • 6- The Redemption of Democracy 177
  • 7- The Mystery of Iniquity 195
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