Ideas and Men: The Story of Western Thought

By Crane Brinton | Go to book overview

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER STUDY
How to Use This Book

This book is not a digest or survey of Western thought in all its range and variety. If, as is contended in the introductory chapter, most of the substance of such a survey must deal with noncumulative knowledge, then it is quite impossible for anyone to produce an authoritative survey, digest, or elementary manual of intellectual history, like one a good popularizer of science could produce for such fields of cumulative knowledge as physics or chemistry. An intellectual history is inevitably in part a series of private judgments made by the man who writes it. Unless that man is sure that he knows the right interpretation always-and this writer is not so sure -- he will do better to afford his readers constant invitations to go through the original stuff of intellectual history, and to make up their own minds on many matters.

This book is, then, a kind of guidebook. Now a good guidebook to a specific region of this earth will give the traveler much necessary information about the ways of getting around, about railways, hotels, currencies, and the like, and it will provide maps of the country. But it will also, even though the author thinks he isn't doing so, give a great deal of information about what the author thinks is worth looking at, or important, or improving. A man subject to fear of heights could not possibly write the same guide to Switzerland a lover of mountains would write. A guidebook to any such confused and ill-mapped country as the country of the human mind must, though it should try to give as much reliable information as possible about books and writers, inevitably dwell on what the author thinks worth the reader's attention. Yet always the important point is that the traveler -- or reader -- should put himself into the direct experience of traveling, or reading.


Original Writing

1, 2. THE GREEKS

Broadly speaking, there are two methods of sampling the materials that make up the record of Western intellectual history. One is to read whole works as designed by their authors, the other to read selections, anthologies, specially prepared samples. In the first method the reader covers less ground, but he comes nearer the experience the author meant him to have, comes nearer the original. In the second method the reader can cover a great deal of ground, but he never experiences the work as a whole. He experiences only what the

-431-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ideas and Men: The Story of Western Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 486

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.