The Ruins and Excavations of Ancient Rome

By Rodolfo Lanciani | Go to book overview

XV. MURI URBIS (the Walls). — Rome has been fortified seven times, with seven lines of walls: by the first King, by Servius Tullius, by Aurelian, by Honorius, by Leo IV., by Urban VIII., and by the Italian government.

The literature on this point of Roman history and topography is very copious. The works in which the subject is treated from a general point of view are —

Antonio Nibby, Le mura di Roma, disegnate da Sir W. Gell. 1820. — Ste fano Piale , Six Memoirs, reprinted from the Atti della pont. Accademia rom. d'Archeologia. 1820-35. — Adolf Becker, De Romœ veteris muris atque portis. Leipsie, 1842. — Rodolfo Lanciani, Le. mura e le porte di Servio (in Annal. Inst., 1871, p. 40); and Bull. arch. com., 1876, pp. 24, 121 ( 1888, p. 12). — Heinrich Jordan , Topographie, vol. i. p. 200, Beschreibung der servianischen Mauer; p. 340, die aurelianische Mauer. — Cesare Quarenghi, Le mura di Roma. Rome, 1882.

XVI. MURUS ROMULI (Walls of the Palatine). It is probable that the Alban colonists of the "hill of Pales," protected by marshes and cliffs, contented themselves with raising a palisade and cutting a ditch at the only weak point of their natural fortress, viz. across the neck of the Velia. After coming in contact with their more advanced neighbors, like the inhabitants of the turrigerœ Antemnœ, they thought it more expedient to follow their example, and wall in and fortify their village, which was at the same time the fold of their cattle.

The text most frequently quoted in reference to the Murus Romuli is that of Tacitus (Ann., xii. 24), according to which the furrow ploughed by the hero — the sulcus primigenius — started from a point in the Forum Boarium, marked in later times by the bronze Bull of Myron; and followed the valley between the Palatine and the Aventine as far as the altar of. Consus, the valley between the Palatine and the Cælian as far as the Curiæ Veteres, the east slope of the hill as far as the Sacellum Larum. The same historian says that the Ara Maxima of Hercules was included within the furrow, and Dionysius states that Vesta's temple was outside it. The furrow followed the foot of the cliffs or slopes of the Palatine, its course being marked with stone cippi. Others affirm that the city of Romulus was square (τετράγωνος — Roma Quadrata). The truth is that neither the walls nor the pomerium of Romulus can be said to make a square; that a line drawn from beyond the Ara Maxima to the Ara Consi cannot be said to go "along the foot of the cliffs of the Palatine" (per ima montis Palatini); that the valley in those days was covered with water, deep enough to be navi-

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ruins and Excavations of Ancient Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents xiii
  • List of Illustrations xix
  • Book I - General Information 1
  • Book II - The Ruins and Excavations of the Palatine 106
  • Book III - A Walk Through the Sacra Via from the Coliseum to the Capitoline Hill 188
  • Book IV - Urbs Sacra Regionum XIV 320
  • Conclusion - The General Aspect of the City 561
  • Appendix 571
  • Indexes 593
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 619

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.