A Victorian Anthology, 1837-1895: Selections Illustrating the Editor's Critical Review of British Poetry in the Reign of Victoria

By Edmund Clarence Stedman | Go to book overview

THE ICTORIAN EPOCH

(PERIOD OF TENNYSON, ARNOLD, BROWNING, ROSSETTI, AND SWINBURNE)


COMPOSITE IDYLLIC SCHOOL

Frederich Tennyson

THIRTY-FIRST OF MAY

AWAKE! -- the crimson dawn is glowing,
And blissful breath of Morn
From golden seas is earthward flowing
Thro' mountain-peaks forlorn;
'Twixt the tall roses, and the jasmines near,
That darkly hover in the twilight air,
I see the glory streaming, and I hear
The sweet wind whispering like a messenger.

'T is time to sing! -- the Spirits of Spring
Go softly by mine ear,
And out of Fairyland they bring
Glad tidings to me here;
'T is time to sing! now is the pride of
Youth
Pluming the woods, and the first rose ap-pears,
And Summer from the chambers of the South
Is coming up to wipe away all tears.

They bring glad tidings from afar
Of Her that cometh after
To fill the earth, to light the air,
With music and with laughter;
Ev'n now she leaneth forward, as she stands,
And her fire-wing'd horses, shod with gold,
Stream, like a sunrise, from before her hands,
And thro' the Eastern gates her wheels are roll'd.

'T is time to sing -- the woodlands ring
New carols day by day;
The wild birds of the islands sing
Whence they have flown away;
'T is time to sing: the nightingale is come,
nd 'mid the laurels chants he all night long,
And bids the leaves be still, the winds be dumb,
And like the starlight flashes forth his song.

Immortal Beauty from above,
Like sunlight breath'd on cloud,
Touches the weary soul with love,
And hath unwound the shroud
Of buried Nature till she looks again
Fresh in infantine smiles and childish tears,
And o'er the rugged hearts of aged men
Sheds the pure dew of Youth's delicious years.

The heart of the awaken'd Earth
Breathes odorous ecstasy;
Let ours beat time unto her mirth,
And hymn her jubilee!
The glory of the Universal Soul
Ascends from mountain-tops, and lowly flowers,
The mighty pulses throbbing through the
Whole
Call unto us for answering life in ours.

-187-

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A Victorian Anthology, 1837-1895: Selections Illustrating the Editor's Critical Review of British Poetry in the Reign of Victoria
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Introduction ix
  • Note xvi
  • Table of Contents xvii
  • I - Early Years of the Reign 1
  • The Passing of the Elder Bards 2
  • II - The Victorian Epoch 185
  • Prelude 186
  • The Ictorian Epoch 187
  • III - Close of the Era 481
  • Impression 482
  • IV - Colonial Poets 613
  • England and Her Colonies 614
  • Biographical Notes 677
  • Indexes 711
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