Family and Class in a London Suburb

By Peter Willmott; Michael Young | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 3
EFFECTS OF SOCIAL MOBILITY

IN the book as a whole occupation is the main criterion of social class, and we have also used it here in examining the effects of moving from one class to another. Men and single women were classified according to their own occupation, married women and widows according to their husband's. People over 60 were classified according to their occupation at 60. We based our grouping of occupations into social classes upon that of the Registrar General, partly because this enabled us to compare our results with Census data, and partly because of the convenience of having a ready-made index classifying most known jobs into occupational groups.1 But we did not follow exactly the same scheme because we wanted particularly to distinguish, as the Registrar General's five-fold classification does not, between manual and non-manual occupations. This meant differentiating between various occupational groups in the Registrar General's Class III. Throughout the book, 'non-manual' occupations are those in the Registrar General's Class I (Professional), and Class II (Intermediate) together with those in Class III (Skilled) who are also in the Registrar General's Socio-Economic Groups 6 ('Clerical workers') and 7 ('Shop assistants'). Group 6 comprises all clerical workers, except for 'costing, accounting and estimating clerks' who appear in Class II; Group 7, as well as all shop assistants and salesmen, includes commercial travellers, canvassers and insurance agents.2 'Manual'occupations are the rest of the Registrar General's Class III, together with Class IV (Partly skilled) and Class V (Unskilled).

There are a number of occupations which we have classified as 'manual' which might well have been regarded as 'non-manual'. Foremen are an obvious example. The difficulty about them is that,

____________________
1
See Classification of Occupations.
2
For further details see e.g. Census 1951, Occupation Tables, p. xi and Table 1.

-159-

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Family and Class in a London Suburb
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • I- Profile of a Suburb 1
  • II- House-Centred Couples 15
  • III- Generations Apart 28
  • IV- Are the Parents Deserted? 36
  • V- Growing Old without Children 51
  • VI- Mothers and Daughters 61
  • VII- Class and Family Visiting 77
  • VIII- The Organization of Sociability 87
  • IX- The Pattern of Friendship 99
  • X- The Tensions of Social Class 111
  • XI- In Conclusion -- Life in a Suburb 123
  • Appendix I- Methods of Sampling 133
  • Appendix 2- Interviewers'' Instructions and Interview Schedule for General Survey 139
  • Appendix 3- Effects of Social Mobility 159
  • Appendix 4- Additional Tables 168
  • Appendix 5- Tests of Statistical Significance 172
  • Appendix 6 178
  • Index 181
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