An Analysis of the Kinsey Reports on Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Female

By Donald Porter Geddes | Go to book overview

Love isn't lacking in Kinsey


ONE FAMILY'S VIEW

Mrs. W.

OF ALL THE CONTRIBUTORS to this volume, Mrs. W. is the only one who is not an expert, at least in the ordinary sense of the word. She speaks her views on Kinsey as an ordinary mother, though in this sense she can certainly be considered an expert, being the mother of four, all in their teens. And in the matter of the education of her children on sexual matters she has taken a scientific approach, and the results, from all reports, qualify her as an expert, at least in this sphere.

Mrs. W.'s views on the Kinsey studies are significant in another respect, for in many ways she can be considered representative of the women interviewed by Kinsey. She is college-educated, in her early forties, and has been a city-dweller for a good part of her life, though now she lives with her husband, who is a lawyer, and her children in a rural community not far from New York City. She was born a Quaker, has taught school, and has been active in such groups as the League of Women Voters, parents' associations, local youth centers.

We have asked Mrs. W. how the Kinsey Report on Women affected her and her children, if she learned from it or found it useful in terms of their sexual education, and also how her children reacted if and when they read "reports" on the Report. To these questions Mrs. W. has come up with a number of pertinent answers -- among them, that her children and their friends did not have an "extraordinary" interest in the Report, and that is probably typical of children who have received adequate sex information in their homes; that the Kinsey Report has been reassuring on problems such as masturbation; that one of her daughters provided her with the distinction between "petting" and "necking," not found in the Report. One thing emphasized by Mrs. W. has already been pointed out by some of our experts -- that one of the main problems of sex education is the emotional reactions of parents. And she concludes -- though on this point at least some of our experts would disagree -- that consideration of love isn't lacking in Kinsey, that every page, carefully read, makes one wonder about it, that in fact the whole Report emphasizes the importance of love.

-154-

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An Analysis of the Kinsey Reports on Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Female
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Incisive Comment 1
  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 11
  • Part One - Sixteen Authorities Evaluate the Kinsey Report on Women 31
  • A Source of Error Atomism of Behavior 32
  • So Noble an Effort Corrupted 41
  • The Three Human Females 49
  • Kinsey and the Moral Problem of Man's Sexual Life 62
  • Education about Sex Changing Motives and Methods 71
  • The Scientific Method 91
  • Conclusion 116
  • A Most Important Book, But... 118
  • Implications for Marriage and Sexual Adjustment 130
  • I Am Concerned... 138
  • Dr. Kinsey's Summum Bonum 143
  • One Family's View 154
  • Sexual Behavior in the Young Human Female and Male 165
  • Sex and the Female Character 171
  • The Reading of Kinsey as a Meaningful Experience 183
  • The Marquis de Sade and the First Psychopathia Sexualis 193
  • The Kinsey Report 212
  • Altruism 230
  • Reactions to the Male Volume 261
  • Bibliography 276
  • The 20th of August 285
  • Analyses of the First Four Important Reviews of the Female Volume 297
  • Epilogue 304
  • Index 313
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