M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio

By R. G. Austin | Go to book overview

APPENDIX III
CAELIUS AND CATULLUS

CAELIUS is generally thought to have been a rival of Catullus for Clodia's affections. This view depends upon two complementary assumptions: (1) that Catullus alludes to M. Caelius Rufus in an or some of the poems in which a Caelius or a Rufus is mentioned, (2) that Catullus' Lesbia was the Clodia of Cicero's speech, i.e. the wife of Q. Metellus. Neither can be proved, but both are highly probable.

1. Catullus names a Caelius in poems 58 and 100. In 58 he tells Caelius of Lesbia's utter depravity, in tones of misery and horror; there is nothing to show his feeling for this man, except the fact that he has made him the recipient of such a confidence. In too Caelius is a friend who has stood by Catullus in an unhappy love- affair (Lesbia is not named), and Catullus wishes him good luck in his own love. It is hard not to suppose that both poems are addressed to the same man; and if that is so, then neither can refer to M. Caelius Rufus, for the Caelius of 100 is a Veronese (for Caelii at Verona see CIL v. 3441, 3570, 3689)--and our Caelius had no connexion with Verona, unless the evidence adduced in Appendix II is totally misconceived. If they are addressed to different men, it could be claimed that 58 may refer to M. Caelius Rufus: in that case, the situation in this poem has to be reconciled with the evidence of another (77), a proceeding which in my view strains probability.

Catullus names a Rufus in poems 69 and 77 (the text of 59 is uncertain, and nothing can be based upon it). The tone here has nothing in common with that of either 58 or 100: it is futile to attempt to link the two pairs of poems, and so to produce an unimpeachable M. Caelius Rufus.1 Catullus attacks Rufus in both, but it is improbable that he is addressing the same man in both.2 The Rufus of 69 is a dirty creature, pilloried for his public nastiness: the Rufus of 77 is a one-time friend, who has done Catullus a private, personal wrong by creeping in and stealing away his

____________________
1
There would be, however, no inherent difficulty in the use of two names for the same person. Catullus uses both Calvus (14, 53, 96) and Licinius (50), both Ortalus (65) and Hortensius (95), and he calls the bride in 61 now Iunia, now Aurunculeia. In this speech Cicero addresses L. Herennius Balbus as Herennius (25, 56) or Balbus (27, 53).
2
Rufus was a very common name, and the dissociation of the two is not far-fetched.

-148-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents iv
  • Introduction Life of Caelius v
  • The Manuscripts xvii
  • Selection of Readings from Ox. Pap. X. 1251 (Π) xxii
  • Collation of the Oxford and the Teubner Text xxiv
  • Bibliography xxviii
  • Sigla xxxii
  • M. Tvlli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio 1
  • Note 40
  • Commentary 41
  • Appendix I Date of Caelius' Birth 144
  • Appendix II Place of Caelius' Birth 146
  • Appendix III Caelius and Catullus 148
  • Appendix IV Date of Delivery of the Pro Caelio 151
  • Appendix V the Charges 152
  • Appendix VI the Prosecutors 154
  • Appendix VI the Prosecutors 157
  • Appendix VII the Case Against Antonius in 59 B.C. 158
  • Appendix VIII Note on the Composition of the Speech 159
  • Additional Notes 162
  • Index Nominvm 176
  • Index Verborvm 176
  • Index Rervm 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.