M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio

By R. G. Austin | Go to book overview

APPENDIX IV
DATE OF DELIVERY OF THE PRO CAELIO

THE evidence rests on two passages in the speech itself: § 1 'quod diebus festis ludisque publicis . . . unum hoc iudicium exerceatur', and § 78 'qua in civitate paucis his diebus Sex. Clodius absolutus est'.

Sex. Clodius stood his trial towards the end of March 56 B.C. ( Q.F. ii. 4. 6). Therefore Caelius' trial must have occurred about the beginning of April. Cicero was absent from Rome this year from 9 April to 6 May; he accounts in detail for events at Rome between 6 and 9 April, but does not mention this case ( Q.F. ii. 5). But in the same letter he speaks of another lately sent; this earlier letter has not been preserved, and it seems as if the trial must have been mentioned in it, for Cicero would not have failed to inform his brother of his triumph over Clodia. It would appear, then, that the case came into court on one of the first four days of April; now the ludi Megalenses began on 4 April (§ 1 note; see Sternkopf, Hermes xxxix, 1904, pp. 412-14), which must have been the day of Cicero's speech. It is unlikely that the trial was completed in one day, in view of the number of speakers (cf. H., p. 240), and so, as Cicero is speaking last, it must have begun on 3 April.

W. and others assume that the first day of the games could in any case have been the only possible day because it alone was not marked in the Calendar as nefastus ( Warde Fowler, Roman Festivals, p. 22). This is wrong, for criminal jurisdiction was not interrupted by such marks; it was because of the ludi, not because a day was nefastus, that the courts were closed; so that this trial, as also that of Nfilo which was held 4-8 April 52 B.C., shows that cases of vis could be brought into court even during ludi. See Greenidge, LP, p. 457, note 6, where other instances are given of trials on dies nafasti.

-151-

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M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents iv
  • Introduction Life of Caelius v
  • The Manuscripts xvii
  • Selection of Readings from Ox. Pap. X. 1251 (Π) xxii
  • Collation of the Oxford and the Teubner Text xxiv
  • Bibliography xxviii
  • Sigla xxxii
  • M. Tvlli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio 1
  • Note 40
  • Commentary 41
  • Appendix I Date of Caelius' Birth 144
  • Appendix II Place of Caelius' Birth 146
  • Appendix III Caelius and Catullus 148
  • Appendix IV Date of Delivery of the Pro Caelio 151
  • Appendix V the Charges 152
  • Appendix VI the Prosecutors 154
  • Appendix VI the Prosecutors 157
  • Appendix VII the Case Against Antonius in 59 B.C. 158
  • Appendix VIII Note on the Composition of the Speech 159
  • Additional Notes 162
  • Index Nominvm 176
  • Index Verborvm 176
  • Index Rervm 179
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