M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio

By R. G. Austin | Go to book overview

the scabrous charges brought by Clodia on moral grounds, through her own mortification and desire for revenge. Cicero rallies his whole forces to show that Clodia is herself entirely immoral, and that therefore her evidence has no weight at all. He uses this method to counter the deep impression made on the jury by Herennius Balbus who summed up for the prosecution, and does so with complete success; a parallel to his line of argument is suggested by the case of Ferrar v. Mont in Galsworthy's Modern Comedy. It is impossible to assume that the prosecution did not mention Caelius' relations with Clodia1 in the hope that Cicero would not speak of them either. Rather, the whole case is made to turn on the point, and Cicero skilfully and unexpectedly defends Caelius on the ground that it was the woman who tempted him, thus revenging himself for the wrongs he had suffered from the Clodian gens by exposing Clodia as perhaps no great Roman lady had ever been exposed before.


APPENDIX VI
THE PROSECUTORS

L. SEMPRONIUS ATRATINUS, the formal initiator of the prosecution, is said to have been only seventeen years old at the time.2 This is compatible with Cicero's attitude towards him in §§ 2, 3, 15 (cf. Quintil. xi. 1. 68).

Atratinus' father, whose double prosecution by Caelius was the immediate cause of this trial, was on friendly terms with Cicero (§§ 7, 76); the word beneficium in § 7 may imply that the latter had defended him in some suit (see note). Yet there is no evidence that Cicero ever delivered a speech on behalf of a Sempronius Atratinus. However, on 11 February 56 B.C. he defended L. Calpurnius Bestia on a charge of ambitus ( Q.F. ii. 3. 6), and Münzer has shown beyond all reasonable doubt that this was none other than Atratinus' father.3 For an inscription from Hypata in Thessaly runs as follows ( Dessau, Inscr. Lai. SeL 9461):

. Here we have a Sempronius Atratinus whose father was named Bestia, the family name of the Calpurnii; but as after the patrician holders

____________________
1
See § 30 note; cf. H., p. 228; Reitzenstein, p. 32.
2
St. Jerome, ad Euseb. Chron. Ol. 189 (21 B.C.) 'Atratinus, qui XVII natus annos Caelium accusaverat, clarus inter oratores habetur. ad extremum morborum taedio in balneo, voluntate exanimatus heredem reliquit Augustum.'
3
Hermes xliv, 1909, pp. 135 f.

-154-

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M. Tulli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents iv
  • Introduction Life of Caelius v
  • The Manuscripts xvii
  • Selection of Readings from Ox. Pap. X. 1251 (Π) xxii
  • Collation of the Oxford and the Teubner Text xxiv
  • Bibliography xxviii
  • Sigla xxxii
  • M. Tvlli Ciceronis Pro M. Caelio Oratio 1
  • Note 40
  • Commentary 41
  • Appendix I Date of Caelius' Birth 144
  • Appendix II Place of Caelius' Birth 146
  • Appendix III Caelius and Catullus 148
  • Appendix IV Date of Delivery of the Pro Caelio 151
  • Appendix V the Charges 152
  • Appendix VI the Prosecutors 154
  • Appendix VI the Prosecutors 157
  • Appendix VII the Case Against Antonius in 59 B.C. 158
  • Appendix VIII Note on the Composition of the Speech 159
  • Additional Notes 162
  • Index Nominvm 176
  • Index Verborvm 176
  • Index Rervm 179
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