Henry VIII and the English Reformation

By Arthur J. Slavin | Go to book overview

THE ENGLISH SCHISM:
OCCASION AND CAUSE

GUSTAVE CONSTANT

Gustave Constant was born in 1869 in the Vendée and after close studies
in literature and diplomatics at l'Ecole des Hautes-Etudes he spent three years
in the French College at Rome. In 1893 he was ordained a Roman Catholic
priest. For some years he pursued archival research abroad, until in 1908 he
was named Professor of Modern Church History at the Catholic Institute in
Paris. Gravely wounded while on active service in the Dardanelles campaign of
the First World War, Constant refused to slacken the pace of his studies or
teaching and traveled widely in Europe, Africa, and the United States after
1918. Before his death in 1940 he published many important books and arti
cles, many of them about sixteenth-century church history. Among his chief
works are: La Réforme en Angleterre, 2 volumes; La Légation du Cardinal Morone près de l'empereur et le concile de Trente and his Concession à l'Allemagne de la communion sous les deux espèces, 2 volumes.

THE OCCASION of the English Schism is so patent and indisputable that many people scarcely trouble to look for the causes, while some even think that the occasion of it, Henry VIII's divorce, was in reality the cause. That is certainly a short, easy and simple solution, but truth is -- generally -- more complicated than that. In his English Law and The Renaissance Maitland1 admits that the history of the Reformation in England is complicated. To attribute everything to the king's despotism and the people's servility is an easy way of dealing with the subject, but it has the disadvantage of mistaking the effect for the cause. For it was precisely in his conflict with Rome that Henry's eyes were opened and he saw how far his power might be extended. "If the lion knew his own strength, hard were it for any man to rule him," said Thomas More to Cromwell, al- luding to the king. But the lion was not yet aware that its claws had grown; and it experimented with them on the Church. We must then discover what it was that allowed the king to meddle with the Church and the Reformation to spring up and develop on English soil.

Henry VIII's Schism was but an episode in the eternal conflict between Church and State, and in England this conflict was not new. Who has not heard of the terrible struggles between Alexander III and Henry II in the twelfth, and between Innocent III and John Lackland in the thirteenth century, struggles which ended in humiliation for the royal power? It would almost seem that the memory of that humiliation had not been forgotten. "For his part, Henry VIII meant to remedy it," wrote the imperial ambassador in 1533, "and repair the error of Kings Henry II and John, who, by deceit, being in difficulties, had made this realm and Ireland tributary."

A few days before his death Warham,

____________________
From Gustave Constant, The Reformation in England ( London, 1940), pp. 1-8 and 21-34. Reprinted by permission of Sheed and Ward Ltd., London, and of Harper and Row, Publishers, New York.
1
F. W. Maitland was perhaps the greatest English legal scholar and historian of his time; he died in 1906.

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Henry VIII and the English Reformation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • An Extraordinary Pretext 1
  • The Royal Reformer: An Apology 7
  • By a Just Judgment of God 10
  • Arbiter of Christendom 13
  • The Scourge of Popery 17
  • The Image of God upon Earth 21
  • The Judgment upon His Motives and Actions 27
  • If a Lion Knew His Own Strength 33
  • The Tyranny of Tudor Times 39
  • The English Schism: Occasion and Cause 45
  • Tudor Humanism and Henry VIII 52
  • King or Minister? 57
  • Wolsey: Prelude to a Revolution 65
  • The Fate of the Monasteries 70
  • The Origins of Protestantism in English Society 81
  • Introduction 81
  • O the Great Judgments of God! 91
  • Suggestions for Additional Reading 100
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 102

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.