Leo Tolstoy, an Annotated Bibliography of English Language Sources to 1978

By David R. Egan; Melinda A. Egan | Go to book overview

Section IV
PHILOSOPHY (GENERAL)

BOOKS
1214 Crosby Ernest H. Tolstoy and His Message. London: Fifield, 1911; 96p. A spiritual biography of Tolstoy, by a personal friend, concentrating on his moral, religious, and philosophical views rather than his fiction. The sources of his spiritual crisis are identified and his ethical beliefs summarized by way of analysis of On Life, the work considered to be the foundation of his ethical works. In all, his philosophy is positively assessed, and Tolstoy is commended for his tireless and sincere pursuit of the "true path." Reviewed in:
Arena, 30 ( Dec. 1903), 660-662.
Open Court, 17 ( Dec. 1903), 708-712.
1215 Daniel C. W. Tolstoy's Teaching. London: C. W. Daniel, 1919 .
1216 Dillon Emile J. Count Leo Tolstoy. A New Portrait. London: Hutchinson, 1934; 286p., illus. A critical account of Tolstoy's philosophic, religious, and ethical views, with emphasis on their shortcomings. In particular, the contradictory nature of his beliefs is stressed; they are seen as stemming from the acute opposition of the physical and spiritual sides of his personality. Respect is nonetheless maintained for his intellect, humanitarianism, and literary talent.
1217 Greenwood E. B. Tolstoy: The Comprehensive Vision. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1975; 184p., bib. 172-176. A philosophical analysis of Tolstoy based on the contention that since he "was constantly searching in his life for a comprehensive vision--a vision equal to the confusion of a life," his character, work, and life can be best understood from a philosophic perspective. His creations and activities are thus discussed as a means of discerning his contribution to answering such questions as, What is the nature of happiness? Does history have a meaning? and Can men find truth in matters of religion? Over a score of his works are analyzed, with

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