Thirty-Two Stories

By Edgar Allan Poe; Stuart Levine et al. | Go to book overview

THE ASSIGNATION

"The Assignation"is a convincing exercise in Byronic romanticism. It incorporates a poem which Poe wrote in the style of Byron, and which, as Mabbott (9, II) puts it, "is closely related to lines Byron wrote outfor Mary Chaworth," Byron's first love. It uses details of Byron's well-known biography--that the poet was a good swimmer, that the "visionary" hero who rescues the baby, like Byron, is (probably) an English poet living in a palazzo in Venice. Like Byron, he is in love with the young wife of a villainous old man ( Countess Guiccioli and the Count, who actually threatened Byron). Even the narrator may be identifiable as the Irish poet and friend of Byron, Thomas Moore, though Moore was a good friend, and not just a slight acquaintance. Poe might, in fact, want readers to think that it was Poe who knew Byron slightly, and fished him out of the canal one night in Venice.

Noting the connections between "The Assignation"and Byron's life (which periodicals of the time covered the way ours cover the doings of stars or royalty), Benton (1) argues that the tale is a hoax. Yet though the Byron material is present, we are not sure that "hoax" accurately describes Poe intention: too many elements in the tale suggest serious purpose. Poe was capable of producing stories serious in intent yet filled with satiric or simply "hidden" allusions and referents. He was also a commercial journalist, and the idea of writing a story in which his readers would recognize Byron and his adventures would have been appealing. "Hoax" seems not quite the right word: the Irving-Hughes "autobiography" of 1971 was apparently a hoax, as were the "Hitler memoirs" of 1983; what Poe did in 1834 involves exploitation of a celebrity notoriety, but is in no way an attempt to defraud or even fool anyone. Besides, the story is in its way very beautiful, and certainly successful for many readers, who are carried along by the romantic setting and the operatic plot.


PUBLICATIONS IN POE'S TIME
The Lady's Book, January 1834
The Southern Literary Messenger, July 1835
Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, 1840
The Broadway Journal, June 7, 1845

See also note 20 for the publication history of the poem.

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thirty-Two Stories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Metzengerstein 1
  • The Duc de L'Omelette 9
  • Ms. Found in a Bottle 16
  • The Assignation 26
  • Shadow 42
  • Silence 48
  • Ligeia 54
  • How to Write a Blackwood Article 68
  • The Fall of the House of Usher 87
  • William Wilson 104
  • The Man of the Crowd 120
  • The Murders in the Rue Morgue 130
  • A Descent into the Maelström 159
  • Eleonora 174
  • The Masque of the Red Death 181
  • The Pit and the Pendulum 188
  • The Domain of Arnheim 200
  • The Tell-Tale Heart 216
  • The Gold-Bug 221
  • The Black Cat 248
  • The Purloined Letter 256
  • The Balloon-Hoax 272
  • The Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq. 284
  • Some Words with a Mummy 303
  • The Power of Words 318
  • The Imp of the Perverse 323
  • The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar 329
  • The Cask of Amontillado 339
  • Mellonta Tauta 346
  • Hop-Frog 361
  • Von Kempelen and His Discovery 370
  • Bibliography 379
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.