Sir Philip Sidney

By Philip Sidney; Katherine Duncan-Jones | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY
1554 Sidney born at Penshurst, Kent, 30 November, eldest child of Sir Henry
Sidney and Lady Mary, sister of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.
Philip II, who had married Mary Tudor in July, was his godfather.
1564 Enrolled at Shrewsbury School 17 October, along with his friend and
future biographer Fulke Greville ( 1554-1628).
1565 Sir Henry Sidney began the first of three terms of office as Lord
Deputy Governor of Ireland.
1566 Visited Kenilworth and Oxford, where he witnessed splendid enter-
tainments for the Queen (August and September).
1567/8 Became an undergraduate at Christ Church, Oxford, where his
contemporaries included William Camden, George Peele, Richard
Hakluyt, Walter Ralegh, Thomas Bodley, Richard Hooker, and
perhaps John Lyly.
1572 Began European tour as part of the train of the Earl of Lincoln
(May); witnessed the massacre of Protestants in Paris, 24 August (St
Bartholomew's Day); met the Protestant diplomat Hubert Languet in
Strasbourg; spent winter in Frankfurt.
1573 Travelled to Venice by way of Heidelberg and the imperial court at
Vienna.
1574 Studied in Padua and Venice, where his portrait (now lost) was painted
by Paolo Veronese (February); visited Genoa and Florence (March); at
Vienna with Hubert Languet, apart from an excursion to Poland in
October (August-January).
1575 Returned to England by way of Brno, Prague, Dresden, Frankfurt,
Heidelberg, and Antwerp, reaching London in June. With his parents
and sister accompanied the Queen on progress to Kenilworth,
Lichfield, Chartley, Stafford, Chillington, Dudley, and Worcester.
Accompanied his father to Shrewsbury; returned to Court (August).
1576 Joined his father in Ireland (August-October), possibly travelling home
with the body of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex, whose dying wish
had been that his daughter Penelope ('Stella') should marry Philip.
Succeeded his father as 'Cup-bearer' to the Queen.
1577 Sent as ambassador to the newly acceded Emperor Rudolph in Prague
(February-June), renewing European contacts en route and meeting
Don John of Austria, Edmund Campion, and (May) William of
Orange. Visited Wilton, Wiltshire, where his sister Mary was newly
married to the 2nd Earl of Pembroke (August-September); here he
may have written 'A dialogue between two shepherds' and may have
begun the 'Old' Arcadia. Wrote a defence of his father's policies in

-xxi-

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Sir Philip Sidney
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Oxford Authors i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • Chronology xxi
  • Note on Text xxv
  • A Dialogue Between Two Shepherds, Uttered in a Pastoral Show at Wilton 1
  • The Lady of May 5
  • Certain Sonnets 14
  • The Old Arcadia 42
  • Lamon's Tale 139
  • Asthrophil and Stella 153
  • The Defence of Poesy 212
  • The New Arcadia the Pitiful Story of the Paphlagonian Unkind King 253
  • Psalms Psalm Vi: Domine Ne in Furore *
  • Letters 279
  • Appendices 299
  • Notes 330
  • Further Reading 409
  • Selective Glossary 411
  • Index of First Lines 412
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