Sir Philip Sidney

By Philip Sidney; Katherine Duncan-Jones | Go to book overview

CERTAIN SONNETS

1

Since, shunning pain, I ease can never find;
Since bashful dread seeks where he knows me harmed;
Since will is won, and stopped ears are charmed;
Since force doth faint, and sight doth make me blind;
Since loosing, long, the faster still I bind;
Since naked sense can conquer reason armed;
Since heart in chilling fear with ice is warmed;°
In fine, since strife of thought but mars the mind:
I yield, 0 love, unto thy loathed yoke,
Yet craving law of arms, whose rule doth teach 10 That hardly used, whoever prison broke,
In justice quit, of honour made no breach:°
Whereas, if I a grateful guardian° have,
Thou art my lord, and I thy vowed slave.


2

When love, puffed up with rage of high disdain,
Resolved to make me pattern of his might,
Like foe, whose wits inclined to deadly spite,,
Would often kill, to breed more feeling pain;
He would not, armed with beauty only, reign,
On those affects which easily yield to sight,
But virtue sets so high, that reason's light,
For all his strife, can only bondage gain:
So that I live to pay a mortal fee,
Dead-palsy-sick of all my chiefest parts; 10 Like those whom dreams make ugly monsters see,
And can cry 'Help!' with nought but groans and starts.
Longing to have, having no wit to wish,
To starving minds such is god Cupid's dish.

-14-

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Sir Philip Sidney
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Oxford Authors i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • Chronology xxi
  • Note on Text xxv
  • A Dialogue Between Two Shepherds, Uttered in a Pastoral Show at Wilton 1
  • The Lady of May 5
  • Certain Sonnets 14
  • The Old Arcadia 42
  • Lamon's Tale 139
  • Asthrophil and Stella 153
  • The Defence of Poesy 212
  • The New Arcadia the Pitiful Story of the Paphlagonian Unkind King 253
  • Psalms Psalm Vi: Domine Ne in Furore *
  • Letters 279
  • Appendices 299
  • Notes 330
  • Further Reading 409
  • Selective Glossary 411
  • Index of First Lines 412
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