Introduction to Group-Analytic Psychotherapy: Studies in the Social Integration of Individuals and Groups

By S. H. Foulkes | Go to book overview

PART II
THE BACKGROUND

We want to show the features of the group analytic Situation and Method by means of some exemplary illustrations. But, before we can do this we must pause to consider what is the background upon which it rests. What are the preconditions on the part of the Therapist and the patients, what do they bring with them into this situation, what are the tasks and general conditions suitable for it to become established?

We shall, of course, mainly have to draw upon our own experiences with our own patients and on the particular circumstances under which this work has been and is being carried out. I would have to describe these in any case in order to make my snapshot illustrations intelligible. It must, however, be understood that Group Analysis can be applied under a far greater variety of circumstances than the selection here represented.

The Therapist. -- The Therapist's background of experience can vary widely in detail, so can the patients' problems and the general conditions under which they meet. Any change in any of these preconditions influences the group-therapeutic situation in major and minor detail. Still, the essential features of a group-analytic procedure, or at least orientation, can be maintained, if we only know what these essential principles are. It is not so much my intention in this book to define them systematically and precisely as to show them in operation.

The Group Analyst, then, brings with him the experience of his work with individual patients. He is familiar with the analytic situation. He can understand, handle and analyse transference reactions in terms of their unconscious significance. He can discern and interpret resistances. He has a sense for the meaning of direct expressions of the unconscious in symbolic and primitive, primary language, as exemplified in dreams; an appreciation of the ways in which repressed urge finds its

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Group-Analytic Psychotherapy: Studies in the Social Integration of Individuals and Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Table of Contents xi
  • Part I - General Introduction 1
  • Part II - The Background 35
  • Part III - The Group-Analytic Situation 55
  • Part IV - The Conductor's Contribution 133
  • Part V - Survey 153
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 181

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.