Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome

By Amy Richlin | Go to book overview

ideology, and their intended audience is male. The paintings are important in suggesting how such a Xenophontic child bride, armed with only observation and the testimony of immediate family and friends, might have viewed the same situation in a way that she could accept and even embrace.

The evolution of erotic imagery on Attic pottery from Hippokleidian dance to romantic love in marriage during a century and a half of Athenian history marks a significant change in ideology. Like modern mass-market literature, these mass- market images must have both reflected and shaped the continually evolving self- images of the inhabitants of the Athenian polis. These changes in vase painting reflect both general changes in social ideology and persistent attitudes of particular segments of society that emerge and vanish as painters developed and abandoned (or lost) specialized markets for their products. Yet such changes do not necessarily reflect improvements in the circumstances of women's lives. Thurston's study of the modern romance is remarkable for its inclusion of readers' responses. What we lack, and mourn the loss of, are Athenian women's voices to speak for themselves.


NOTES

It is a pleasure to acknowledge the following help in preparing this chapter. Research and writing were supported by a grant from the American Council of Learned Societies and a leave from Loyola University of Chicago, with several small grants from the same university. Earlier versions were criticized by Amy Richlin, H. Alan Shapiro, and Keith DeVries. Keith DeVries generously sent me an unpublished manuscript with a catalogue of vases portraying ancient Athenian homosexuality. For the opportunity to consult photographs, I am grateful to Donna Kurtz of the Beazley Archive in Oxford and to Dietrich von Bothmer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Additional assistance was provided by David M. Halperin, Kathleen G. Klein, and Stan W. Denski.

1.
Hereafter, all dates are B.C. unless specified otherwise.
2.
All vases attributed to painters by Beazley are identified by reference to his lists in Attic Black-figure Vase-painters (ABV) and the second edition of Attic Red-figure Vase- painters (ARV2); these provide full identification with citations of illustrations. I generally make no reference to the addenda of each volume, Paralipomena, or Beazley Addenda2, which should all be checked.
3.
Carpenter's ( 1983) attempt to lower the Group's date is not compelling. See Moore 1985, which makes clear stylistic links to Sophilos, who was active around 580-70. In a subsequent article, Carpenter ( 1984) suggests that the Group may not have worked in Athens itself, though he still places its activity in Attica; technical studies might resolve such questions.
4.
These are a kind of graffiti (in the nontechnical sense) which take the form X kalos ("X is handsome") and often have no obvious connection to the scene in which they appear. Those on vases presumably represent a small fraction of what was once written on perishable media. See Dover 1978: 111-24; Robinson and Fluck 1937; Shapiro 1987. Note the special examples in Figure 1.6, which are relevant to the representation.
5.
Moore and Philippides 1986: 18-20. For preliminary reports on the shrine of Nymphe, see Wycherley 1978: 197-200; Travlos 1971: 361-63; ARV2, viii, 1747-48; pub-

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Pornography and Representation in Greece and Rome
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Time Line of Events, Sources, and Persons Discussed xxiv
  • 1: Pornography and Persuasion on Attic Pottery 3
  • Notes 34
  • 2: Tragedy and the Politics of Containment 36
  • Notes 51
  • 3: Eros in Love: Pederasty and Pornography in Greece 53
  • Notes 72
  • 4: The Mute Nude Female Characters in Aristophanes' Plays 73
  • Notes 88
  • Appendix Texts Relating to the Writers of Sexual Handbooks 108
  • Notes 109
  • 6: The Body Female and the Body Politic: Livy's Lucretia and Verginia 112
  • Notes 129
  • 7: The Domestication of Desire: Ovid's Parva Tabella and the Theater of Love 131
  • Notes 155
  • Notes 158
  • Notes 178
  • Notes 179
  • 9: Death as Decoration: Scenes from the Arena on Roman Domestic Mosaics 180
  • Notes 208
  • 10: Callirhoe 212
  • 11: Sweet and Pleasant Passion: Female and Male Fantasy in Ancient Romance Novels 231
  • Notes 249
  • 12: The Edible Woman: Athenaeus's Concept of the Pornographic 250
  • Conclusion 266
  • Notes 269
  • Notes 269
  • Notes 283
  • Bibliography 285
  • Contributors 313
  • Index 315
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