The Reformation and the Towns in England: Politics and Political Culture, c. 1540-1640

By Robert Tittler | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book reflects an interest in Early Modern English provincial towns dating back to the mid-1970s, and it draws upon research undertaken ever since that time. Though from time to time I have stopped to explore particular points (some of which are reconsidered here) and to discuss some of them in print, this is as comprehensive a summary of my adventures with the subject as I expect to produce.

Carried out, as it must be in my case, mostly from across the Atlantic, long research on any phase of British History requires steady funding. Research on local history, with its requisite labours in local archives, requires yet more. Even BritRail passes (and cheese sandwiches from the buffet trolley) and a captive's tour of the Lesser Bed and Breakfast Establishments of the Realm add up over time. This book could not possibly have been written without the generous support of several agencies. The US National Endowment of the Humanities provided a 'Travel to Collections Grant' in the spring of 1990 and a Research Fellowship to support a term's sabbatical in 1991. The Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada provided a Research Fellowship for the period 1991-4, and the American Philosophical Society provided a grant in 1995 which allowed me to take up a Visiting Fellowship at Clare Hall, Cambridge University, in Easter Term of that year. Concordia University's General Research Fund contributed to other expenses along the way. I am very thankful to all these patrons.

I do not work well or happily in isolation, and I am thus heavily indebted to those who have allowed me to try out versions of chapters on their seminars or colloquia outside of Montreal and Quebec. These kind and patient people include Daniel Woolf at Dalhousie; Mark Kishlansky at Harvard; Patrick Collinson, Keith Wrightson, and Tim Stretton at Cambridge; Caroline Barron, Vanessa Harding, David Ormrod, Negley Harte, and Professor the Earl Russell at the Institute of Historical Research in London; Alexandra Johnston and Sally-Beth MacLean at Records of Early English Drama and Joseph Black of University College, all three in the University of Toronto; and Ian Archer of Oxford (and of the pre-Modern Towns Group).

-v-

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