The Reformation and the Towns in England: Politics and Political Culture, c. 1540-1640

By Robert Tittler | Go to book overview

6
Totting Up: Local Resources after the Dissolutions

It cannot be denied that the combined effect of the Dissolutions remained enormously destructive of former ecclesiastical property which lay in towns as well as elsewhere, and enormously disruptive at least in the short run to a host of charitable, educational, and similar social institutions. Nor can it be claimed that either towns or townsmen came to possess the majority of those urban properties confiscated and then resold by the Crown. But in considering these implications for community resources, several related points nevertheless remain more open to debate. To what extent did towns eventually come to possess at least some of these local properties and resources? Did such acquisitions allow a considerable number of towns, especially of the upper or middling ranks, thus to control more of their own resources than before? Was the experience of acquisition and control significant enough to mark a turning point in the self-direction of many English towns in this era? Some aspects of these issues, especially regarding poverty, charity, and education, have been explored fairly extensively. Others, especially concerning the disposition of properties and wealth in general, have not. The task at hand, therefore, is to shed as much further light as possible on the latter, while assessing and summarizing the more complete picture of the former.

In taking up first the question of property and other assets, we must remain sensitive to the patchiness of the sources. They make it impossible to be as certain and precise as one would like. Nevertheless, a wealth of evidence from a variety of town types, both for the acquisition of resources and for their application to provincial town government and political culture, produces rather a different picture than has conventionally been drawn of this problem.1

____________________
1
See above, pp. 46-52.

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Reformation and the Towns in England: Politics and Political Culture, c. 1540-1640
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 395

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.