Divine Destiny: Gender and Race in Nineteenth-Century Protestantism

By Carolyn A. Haynes | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A s the women and men examined in this book read, heard, contested, modified, and utilized one another's ideas, I too have benefited from the diverse and helpful thoughts, criticisms, and advice of many intelligent and supportive people. In particular, I would like to thank members of my two writing groups: Sheila Croucher, Lori Varlotta, Shawn Smith, and Molly Rhodes. Their longstanding friendships and their generous readings of and astute comments on various chapters of the book were invaluable. These pages also owe much to fruitful discussions with and the careful criticism of Robert Haynes, Peter Williams, Mark Pedelty, Curtis Ellison, Benjamin Bertram, Michael Davidson, Barbara Tomlinson, Kathryn Shevelow, and Rachel Klein. Moreover, without the unfailing enthusiasm of Catherine Haynes, Martha Haynes, Bo Platt, Karen Evans, Elyane Laussade, Claire Legas, Karen Miksch, Gail Della Piana, and Muriel Blaisdell, this project could never have been completed. Each of them has helped to foster the varying religious, feminist, and historical sides of myself. My editor, Seetha A-Srinivasan, has been supportive and patient throughout the project. Finally, to Wai Dimock and Nicole Tonkovich, whose critical care and warmth have immeasurably enhanced this book as well as many other aspects of my academic life, go my deepest gratitude.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Divine Destiny: Gender and Race in Nineteenth-Century Protestantism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.