Outlines of English Industrial History

By W. Cunningham; Ellen A. McArthur | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III.
THE MANORS.

23. IN modern social life we find that every citizen may easily recognise a number of distinct interests in which he has a personal part. He is anxious for the maintenance of the power and prosperity of the country as a whole, even though he may not be able to specify the precise way in which any great national disaster would press upon him personally. He is interested in the good government -- in the lighting, paving and sanitation, -- of the town with which he is most closely connected. He probably has a friendly feeling towards one or more country districts, and is glad if the crops are good, and the people comfortable. We have here three distinct types of social life, in each one of which most of us have some sort of interest. But whereas, at the present day, national disaster or national well-being -- the ebb or flow of trade -- is generally and widely felt, while local politics and parochial interests seem to be comparatively trivial, it has not always been so. There was a time when a vast number of Englishmen hardly had reason to look beyond their village or their town, and only came occasionally into conscious contact with the world outside. The prosperity of their own. village or their own town was

Parochial, municipal and national Life.

-28-

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Outlines of English Industrial History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction. 1
  • Chapter I. Immigrants to Britain. 8
  • Chapter Ii. Physical Conditions. 17
  • Chapter Iii. The Manors. 28
  • Chapter Iv. The Towns. 46
  • Chapter V. The Beginnings of National Economic Life. 69
  • Chapter Vi. The Various Sides of National Economic Life. 82
  • Chapter Vii. Money, Credit, and Finance. 140
  • Chapter Viii. Agriculture. 166
  • Chapter Ix. Labour and Capital. 198
  • Chapter X Results of Increased Commercial Intercourse. 241
  • Chronological Table. 255
  • Index 261
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